My Edward Jones story

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norcalstoppy's picture
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Here's my story for those that are looking into the opportunity. To put it simply, it's a once in a lifetime opportunity either way. So if given the chance, DO IT!!!!! Whether you decide if Jones if right for your or not doesn't make a difference. You will learn many invaluable lessons.
HIRING PROCESS
I applied at Jones after seeing the company in Fortune's 100 Best Companies to work for. In 2008, it placed 4th. I put in my online application, and did the questionnaire. About 2 weeks later, I got a call. I first went and talked to a local FA. I liked what I heard and what Jones had to offer. I wanted the opportunity, so I did what I was asked to do. They asked me to get 15 surveys done. I got 35 done all with phone numbers. I moved on through the process and was offered the position. The whole process took about 2 months. The unique thing about Edward Jones interview process is that they don't really look for what you can do for them and what you bring to the table, they look to see if YOU can be one of them if given the chance. Like joining a frat.
 
STUDY FOR SUCCESS
Probably the most boring aspect of your career at Edward Jones. 2 months of studying at home. Great training program. It's a program designed to allow everyone to pass the 7. When I say everyone, I mean everyone. Even though you'll want to speed through it, the process will force you to slow down and go at everyone's pace. It CAN get frustrating and underwhelming. I passed 7 with good score. Real easy test if you're a good test taker. Just when you thought the study material can't get any worse, comes the "do not, do not, do not" for the 66 program. I'm sure the newer guys will know exactly what I'm talking about. 66 study program is even better than 7 program. A lot of stuff overlap from 7 and easy test if you passed 7.
 
KYC
EDWARD JONES HAS ONE OF THE BEST PURE SALES TRAINING PROGRAM I'VE EVER SEEN. When you start a new job, even a sales job, a lot of training is on the products. With EDJ, for 60 hours this week(maybe 70-80), you will do nothing but learn how to talk to people and build rapport with them. My only regret with leaving Jones is that I did not get to experience their Eval/Grad training and PDP training. I can only imagine those will be fantastic. I absolutely believe that if you follow their training, you can become an excellent salesperson no matter the background.
 
DOORKNOCKING
When salespeople talk about getting leads they usually talk about buying a list. But the problem is that the lists you buy is something that anyone can buy. The best list is the one that you make yourself. Edward Jones' prospecting method is what sets Edward Jones apart from everyone else. You essentially make your own list of hot/warm leads. Not only that, they teach you how to develop those leads that you've generated, and they teach you how to close them on a sale. EDJ training offers comprehensive sales training, from the beginning to the end. So believe in the system and do what they tell you to do. IT WORKS. ESPECIALLY THE JEDI MIND TRICK.
 
***TIP to Make your life easier. Forget door knocking in the morning. I've always known that I don't do well with older clients. I just have hard time getting them to listen to what I have to say. But I've always had fantastic success with working folks in their 30s, 40s, and 50s. Pick your niche and go with it. If you want to acquire older clients, go in the morning. But be forewarned that you will go through 30-50 houses with 5 phone numbers. You'll run into a lot of just lonely seniors that wants to chat, but won't give you their number. Business contacts are difficult because they are not talking to you for the sole reason that they're interested in getting more info on what you're offering. I've felt that they're talking to you because they see you as a potential client. It will probably take more time to develop business contacts than residential. The PRIME TIME for door knocking is between 5pm - 8pm or so, depending on when the sun sets. If you have other obligations such as family, then you just gotta accept your fate and be prepared to knock on absurd amount of empty houses, and walk the distance like you're preparing for marathon. But if you're void of any obligations at those hours, then I would start at 2-3pm and work into sunset. Save the morning hours for doing branch training, thank you notes, and data entry. No matter how you slice it, you're going to working 60+ hours a week.
 
RL EXAM
A final interview to make sure that you've been doing the work and learning the sh*t that you needed to learn up until now. If you've been doing everything like you were supposed to, you'll pass.
 
THE STRAW
Ironically, the straw that broke the camel's back came while I was preparing for the RL Exam. Up until that point, you really don't have time to think about anything. You just do what you're told and by the time you're done, you're doing something else. As I was preparing for the RL exam, I had a chance to just sit and reflect on all the things that I have done up to that point. I was proud of what I did. It felt great. I was done with all the groundwork and laying down the foundation. Time was here to take everything that I've learned and done up until this point and run with it. Then I started thinking about the prospects that lie ahead. But the picture that was drawn up was not the future I wanted. A small office of me and my assistant, for the rest of my life - It just wasn't me nor was it something that I wanted. When I went into the RL exam, I tried to look for things that would convince me that I was wrong, but everything that I saw just reaffirmed my fears and what my future with Jones would be like.
 
END OF THE LINE
I thought long and hard about what I wanted to do over the weekend after my RL exam. The answer was pretty clear to me. This would be the end of line for me at EDJ. Went and talk to my field trainer and called the visiting vet  to let 'em know that this is the end of the road for me at Edward Jones.  
 
AFTERTHOUGHT
Edward Jones provided the best *pure sales training* that I've ever received and I will take the many valuable things from my brief stint at EDJ with me going forward in my career. Great company to work for. If you're the right person for the job, then there's no better place. I'm saying that with no judgement or prejudice.
 
There's a reason why EDJ ranks so high up on all the workplace surveys. Only people that really want what EDJ has to offer stays. Notice that I'm not saying only people that wants to be successful, have the freedom, and make a good living, are right for the job. You can get those things anywhere you go, if you're good at what you're doing. But what Edward Jones does so well is FINDING and OFFERING that opportunity to those people that are good fit with its system and culture.
 
If you're like me and can't picture yourself working alone in a small office setting for the rest of your life, it's the worst possible job. Even though I thought I hated it, only after going through the process with Edward Jones did I realize that I actually like working in the box. I like the corporate world. 
 
I tip my hat to all the existing Jones FAs. You guys few and far in between amongst many that try. But those that are not right for the Jones system, I don't see any reason to be discouraged. Being a Jones FA is like buying a music album and falling in love with that one obscure track that only the people that bought the album would even know about. I've heard the song, did the dance, but decided that it's just not for me.
 
For those of you getting started, don't take my word for it. Just put on your headphones and hear it out yourselves. It might be the best song you've ever heard and the dance that will have changed your life.

anonymous's picture
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Best of luck to you.  Some people have an employee mentality and some have an employer mentality.  Those with an employee mentality will be miserable in this business.  It's great that you realized this so soon. 

UNDERMINDED's picture
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I guess I understand your concern with the jones model.  However, the truth of the matter is, if you do this job right, you'll never be alone in an office.  You'll either be sitting across from someone conducting appts, or you'll be on the phone with people discussing they're investments.  You never really feel alone if your doing it right.  Its just a shame you didn't stick around long enough to find out.
 
best of luck to you

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Norc, I admire your candor and your ability to know yourself.  That was a pretty balanced post.  Most people that leave talk about how they were duped by Jones or how awful it was.  At least you recognized that it was a good opportunity for some people.
Best of luck.

jkl1v1n6's picture
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Well said, well spoken.  Best of luck to you.

Marty McFly's picture
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You're right about the 66 training....ugh. "Shall not...Shall not...except...except"
 
Anyway, I hope you find what you're looking for.

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Good luck in whatever you do norcalstoppy.  Thanks for sharing.  Good post. 

Moraen's picture
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norcal - so what are you going to do?

ManOnTheCouch's picture
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I was not impressed with the sales training from Jones when I was there.  They teach you the importance of hard work and numbers, but the actual sales skill development is greatly lacking.  Having worked in other sales fields I was surprised to see how little there was.

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Moraen wrote:norcal - so what are you going to do?
For now, I'll be helping a friend set up wholesale division for his loan modification company. But I'm keeping my options open. To name a few companies that's shown interest:
 
John Hanc***
New York Life
Farmers
AXA Investments
Prudential
Indymac Bank(yeah, i said the same thing.)
HSBC
UnitedHealthCare
AFLAC
 
AXA was the funny one. I get out of my FT's office and get a call in 30 minutes. First thing the lady says is "so you're not with EDJ anymore. Why don't you come in and find out more about AXA?" THAT was a trip. Got a little freaked out so told the lady that I'll call her back.
 
I'm highly interested in NYL, HSBC and UHC.

voltmoie's picture
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ManOnTheCouch wrote:I was not impressed with the sales training from Jones when I was there.  They teach you the importance of hard work and numbers, but the actual sales skill development is greatly lacking.  Having worked in other sales fields I was surprised to see how little there was.I agree with this - they teach you prospecting not sales skill at KYC.  Knocking on doors and getting phone numbers is not sales. I can't comment on anything past that point.Good luck in whatever you choose to do, I know that this is the type of job that you have to have your heart into or you won't make it.  Smart move getting out now, I do hope you have something lined up though.  The job market is BRUTAL.

troll's picture
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It is not necessarily sales training as much as role playing on each other at KYC and practicing on prospects at EVAL/GRAD and PDP on the phone. If you can get in front of 1000 people by PDP and plus talk to most of them several times on the phone you will either figure it out yourself or get burnt out and quit.
To some I guess that does seem like sales training.

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voltmoie wrote: ManOnTheCouch wrote:I was not impressed with the sales training from Jones when I was there.  They teach you the importance of hard work and numbers, but the actual sales skill development is greatly lacking.  Having worked in other sales fields I was surprised to see how little there was.I agree with this - they teach you prospecting not sales skill at KYC.  Knocking on doors and getting phone numbers is not sales. I can't comment on anything past that point.Good luck in whatever you choose to do, I know that this is the type of job that you have to have your heart into or you won't make it.  Smart move getting out now, I do hope you have something lined up though.  The job market is BRUTAL.
 
That's why I made it a point to say it's a comprehensive sales training program. It covers the process from cover to cover, from prospecting to closing. Your sales skills are only as good as your ability to find people that has the ability, capability and desire to buy whatever you're selling, whether it be a service or a product.
 
And yes I know some of you have been blessed with an ability to sell even the air we breathe to anyone that you talk to, but I'm talking about us mere mortals. So if you can walk on water, your birthday falls on Christmas, and know how the universe started, then you know how this thread is going to get clobbered with useless comments too, so refrain from replying and then go find and sell a muni w/ 20% coupon.
 
Thanks to all. I'll keep ya'll updated on where I end up. This should get other noobs idea how the current job market is for those that are entry-level FA/newly licensed.   

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If you are still looking for an opportunity where you don't have to be stuck in an office all day and you can work when you want, where you want, PM me and I'll give you my story.  You sound proactive and dedicated and someone I'd feel good about having in my upline.  I'm only barely 4 months in and I'm well on pace to be making into the six-figures within the next 2 years.  Hope to hear from you.

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SometimesNowhere's picture
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Bigmoneyhoney wrote:If you are still looking for an opportunity where you don't have to be stuck in an office all day and you can work when you want, where you want, PM me and I'll give you my story.  You sound proactive and dedicated and someone I'd feel good about having in my upline.  I'm only barely 4 months in and I'm well on pace to be making into the six-figures within the next 2 years.  Hope to hear from you.
 
Beat it, piker.

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I think its fair to let someone have the opportunity to succeed and do what they want in their life.  Clearly he didn't see it by sitting at a desk and giving in to "the man".  Maybe being a 100% independent broker and having a schedule where you can make your own hours is something that suits him.  I'll leave it up to him to make the choice or not.

Hank Newbie's picture
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Care to elaborate on the Jedi Mind Trick?  Just got back from KYC and don't remember any reference to that.  My ATL may have taught it under a different name...

Spaceman Spiff's picture
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He called it the hamburger technique. 

Moraen's picture
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The Jedi mind trick is that people always remember things in threes. So, while you are the door, and you are trying to get the number, you say, "And the address here is...., and your name again is.... and your phone number is 314 ...." They are just supposed to give you the rest.

SometimesNowhere's picture
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Bigmoneyhoney wrote:I think its fair to let someone have the opportunity to succeed and do what they want in their life.  Clearly he didn't see it by sitting at a desk and giving in to "the man".  Maybe being a 100% independent broker and having a schedule where you can make your own hours is something that suits him.  I'll leave it up to him to make the choice or not.
 
I didn't say anything about not wanting someone to have "the opportunity to succeed and do what they want in their life". In fact, I hope he/she becomes president or owner of some brothel in Nevada or whatever he/she does to bring meaning to their life. I said you are a piker. So again, beat it.

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Bigmoneyhoney wrote:I think its fair to let someone have the opportunity to succeed and do what they want in their life.  Clearly he didn't see it by sitting at a desk and giving in to "the man".  Maybe being a 100% independent broker and having a schedule where you can make your own hours is something that suits him.  I'll leave it up to him to make the choice or not.
 
I think you aren't listening to the OP.  He/she said that they have come to find that they like working in the box, the corporate world, having other people to talk to daily.  Here I am assuming they mean people other than clients or prospects. 

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well the hamburger is hamburger.
 
rule of 3 is something I never heard of, but good to know.
 
Jedi mind trick is the one where you put your head down and keep it glued to the prospecting log when asking for the number. If you do not look up, there will be some awkward silence and then the person will give you the number. It worked about 80-90% of the time. The good thing is that if you do this enough, you'll get used to the awkwardness, but the people on the other side won't. 

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I'm going to go out on a limb and say that norcalstoppy filled his prospecting log from the phone book and realized at his RL exam that he wouldn't be able to survive Eval/Grad.I can see no other reason for backing out at that point in the game. I just wonder, was the decision made before the RL exam or when your RL said, "tell me a little about this prospect?"

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Still@jones wrote:I'm going to go out on a limb and say that norcalstoppy filled his prospecting log from the phone book and realized at his RL exam that he wouldn't be able to survive Eval/Grad.I can see no other reason for backing out at that point in the game. I just wonder, was the decision made before the RL exam or when your RL said, "tell me a little about this prospect?"
 
"If within three (3) years after receipt of your can sell date, your employment with Edward Jones is terminated, you maintain registration of your license with FINRA and accept employment with any entity as either an employee or independent contractor engaged in the sale of securities and/or insurance business, you agree to reimburse Edward Jones the reasonable cost of the training...........The amount you agree to reimburse Edward Jones is $75,000.00."
 
I had to decide if Jones was a good fit for me now or in 3 years. I chose now.

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Except if you are a lawyer, you will have a tough time arguing that one. Not only is that contract very complete, it is also very reasonable. If you use Jones' training for another firm's benefit, Jones will ask to be reimbursed for that training. If you think you found an "out" by quitting just before Eval/Grad, I believe you are mistaken.Judging by your posts, I am sure you did not join Jones with the intent to defraud them of their training, but quitting just before the contract "goes into effect" is exactly what someone would do if it was their intent to defraud. I'm positive you are not the first person to think they found this "loophole". I would just get ready for a bill.

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Still@Jones - I believe norcal is right - I've known several people who left just before Eval/Grad, and Jones didn't come after them.

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Still@jones wrote:Except if you are a lawyer, you will have a tough time arguing that one. Not only is that contract very complete, it is also very reasonable. If you use Jones' training for another firm's benefit, Jones will ask to be reimbursed for that training. If you think you found an "out" by quitting just before Eval/Grad, I believe you are mistaken.Judging by your posts, I am sure you did not join Jones with the intent to defraud them of their training, but quitting just before the contract "goes into effect" is exactly what someone would do if it was their intent to defraud. I'm positive you are not the first person to think they found this "loophole". I would just get ready for a bill.
 
Still@Jones, I'm going to guess the type of life you've lead up until now.
 
You were average student. Went to JC and transferred into a 2nd tier college. Graduated, tried the corporate and you felt miserable, because of the politics, competition, or what have you. The job probably paid hourly. And then you started your career with Jones as a BOA and worked for a big producer. Actually your first job out of school could also have been Jones. He goodknighted you in as a FA. Probably in your 3rd or 4th year in as a FA, in and out of seg 3 production level. You're making the type of money that's envy of your peers, but only a fraction of your biggest client. Your loyalty to Jones is admirable. Your short sightedness and narrow perspective that comes from inexperience and arrogance is not.
 
You said there's no reason why I should've stopped at the stage that I was in. Let me make it clear. You will not understand because you're incapable. You don't see the reasons, because you don't know better.
 
I normally wouldn't careless what people say on the forums, but I read your other post to the other Jones newbie. He doesn't have the right mindset to be successful at Jones, and he probably needed some good guidance from a vet. You took it up a notch and left some harsh comments that was uncalled for. You remind me of the only prick that I met at Jones. Above description was his path to success, if you can call it a success. How far apart is your own story from the above?
 
Probably not very. GG.

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Completely wrong...I've already said in another post that I'm between
KYC & Eval grad...and not getting any special treatment. I also do
not think I was mean to anyone...although, I don't mix words when
commenting to someone who I think is making a mistake.

I'm curious about your post because I too am struggling with the Jones
model (especially the phone work/script). But, much like a bad wife, this is
the company I chose...and I'm going to keep working on making it work.
I learned long ago (and not at junior college) that you should give
every job at least a year before moving on.  For Jones, I believe PDP is the right time to make that assessment.

You are correct about one thing: I am shortsighted & I have a
narrow perspective. It's cause I'm new. But I'm sure that no matter
who's perspective you hear...quitting Jones after 8 weeks to join AXA
doesn't sound like you are following a plan for success.

hmmm...maybe the comment about going back to waiting on tables was a little mean...sorry!

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Moraen's picture
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c'mon wind, you have to realize those thimgs are staged.

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Moraen wrote:c'mon wind, you have to realize those thimgs are staged.
 
I've heard this one before, but the folks who say it never have any proof to back it up.  So, is it staged only on the part of EDJ or are NetApp, Boston Consulting Group, Google, and Wegmans Food Markets in on the staging too? 
 
Then maybe it's staged all over the country too.  Jones has come up as one of the top 10 places to work  from CT to WA and many parts in between.  But, I'll bet that's rigged too. 

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To say that it's staged is pretty silly.  On the other hand, it's also pretty silly to put much meaning into it.  Bagging groceries at Wegman's is a great place to do it if that's what someone wants to do.  Working at Jones is probably a great place to be an advisor for someone who likes the Jones model.

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I never met a single person on a Div trip or otherwise (region, trip to St. Louis for BDW, Visions, etc.) who was ever interviewed. I don't even know someone who knows someone who was interviewed for that. RegisteredRep report card - yes, I have met some of those.

I know someone at SAS who was interviewed though, and I've never worked there. He told me that he knew ahead of time that he was going to be called, and was coached by the PR department.

You tell me what that means.

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I remember reading about Northwestern Mutual in one of those Fortune best places to work articles.  It talked about how the employees were given free meals in the cafeteria.  Obviously, in that case, they were talking about home office employees.  This could be the same.  I haven't read it, so I have no idea.

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So, because you've never met anyone who was interviewed, that means it's rigged?  I've never actually met anyone who won a World Series.  That must mean those are rigged too.  And the one person you know who has been interviewed was coached?  At a different company?  That OBVIOUSLY means that the exact same thing happens at EDJ and all of the other companies that make that list. 
You know what that info means to me?  Nothing.  You have a single instance of coaching and are projecting that instance to all of the other companies.  EDJ specifically because you have a thing against them.  
 
There are (according to Fortune) 34,000 people who work for EDJ.  In your travels you've mabye met 1/100th of them.  I can't say that I know anyone who was interviewed, but that doesn't mean they don't exist.  For all I know they only interview GPs, RLs, department leaders, and team leaders.  They might not interview just the lowly associates. 
 
However, I find it a stretch to assume that it's staged or rigged based on your very limited sample group.  Come back and talk to us when you've found a person at each of the top 10 companies who says they were coached by their PR department. 

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Wind, I've never made an anti-Jones post.  However, you are coming across as someone who is guzzling the Kool-Aid.  Just like there are plenty of reasons that one would want to work at Jones, there are plenty of reasons that one would want to leave Jones or not work at Jones.  It's not all about money.

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Have you ever been in the military?  Ever gone through boot camp?  It's the same psychology at Jones.  Typically they take people who have never been in the business.  They train you in their model and preach "all for one and one for all".  They do a very good job at it.  So does the military.  The pyschology comes from everyone having a shared experience.  Those bonds you build in boot camp are strong, same with Jones training.  You go to St. Louis knowing nothing, are in unfamiliar territory and are in a vulnerable emotional state.  Everyone is feeling the same way. 
 
They build their model on success, meaning those that make it through the first few years will probably make it and have a very good view of the firm.  Maybe not in the current economic times but previously.  If not they will have already left or will be leaving.  Most of these people do not have anything in the industry to compare it to.  So if you do get interviewed you have nothing but glowing reports for the survey. 
 
I think the first couple of years you still believe in the "Jones way", the next few are crucial times, these are the years decisions are made.  Stay in the industry or stay with Jones.  After 5 or more years if you are still with Jones then you are content and will give glowing reports. 
 
My couple of pennies.     

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If you can't see any reasons, then you don't have your eyes open.  That being said, you should keep your eyes shut for now.  You work at Jones and the last thing that you should be doing is looking for reasons why you should be leaving.

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If you are happy there, that's all that counts.  It would be the wrong firm for me, but that doesn't mean squat.

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To address the "all the Best Places awards are rigged" argument:
 
To be honest, they are not rigged, but each company on the list submits applications for them.  So it's not "impartial".  You basically make your best case for the award (for both the Fortune national award and the state awards).  So whoever makes the best case is going to win.  Companies that want to win badly enough (like Jones and others) commit internal human resources and PR firms to the application process to put themselves in the best light.  In fact, each year we get a wire from a PR firm (via our Regional Leader) asking us to submit stories and anecdotes about why Jones is a great place to work (for the state award).  I am sure the only response come from the "happy" people.  It becomes part of the company culture.  The employee interview process is not "rigged".  There are no "payoffs".  But if you don't apply you don't win.  It's as simple as that.  So I think think an argument can be made from both sides on these awards.  You have to basically lobby hard to win (both through the application process and among your employees to give a good review if called on).  And trust me, Jones puts forth quite the effort to win the awards.  No argument about that.  But let's remember, if everyone hated working here, the award wouldn't happen, regardless of how hard Jones tried.

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wind3574 wrote:I know alot of people are hard pressed against Jones, but I really have to say that I don't see any reason that anyone would want to leave Jones other than personal monetary gain. I understand we can probably make more at other firms, but you also have more responsibility. I have the opportunity to be a business owner, without alot of the responsibilities. Now I've heard other reasons like "Jones doesn't allow us to sell certain things, they tie our hands", but are those things really something your client should hold? I don't think Jones says "No" just because. I mean if they could make money selling those products they would, but they just don't feel they are ethical to sell and rightfully so. That really plays into the monetary gain scenario. Why would you sell something that probably isn't that great to your customer, unless it was for monetary gain.
 
I'm with you on a lot of things Windy, but this is straight kool-aid talk.  Jones doesn't offer things because it costs them too much to offer it.  My company doesn't promote American Funds as one of our "Core" offerings to advisors, not because they suck, but because American Funds charges us $75 per ticket charge, as opposed to I think $15 for most other fund families.  To think that Jones doesn't offer things because Jones is looking out for the client by limiting options is absurd.  This goes for other products too like REIT's, etc.

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Actually, I think Jones limits certain investments because of the regulatory nightmare it could create.  We require a lot more oversight than other firms because of the no-OSJ on-site structure.  Jones doesn't want to be responsible for regulating things like futures, options and private equity.  I don't blame them, it's just too hard to train and regulate that many offices.  The home-office field supervisors have too many FA's to cover, so it's easier for them to minimize the risks (likely one of the reasons we don't offer EIA's - they traditionally receive a lot of compliance/regulatory scrutiny).
 
Wind, honestly, financial products in themselves are not "unethical".  There are products sold "unethically", but you can't claim the product itself to be unethical.  Jones MAY feel certain products are not appropriate for most clients, but in most cases, I think they use that as a disguise for why they really don't allow them.  I am not complaining, I accept that we don't have access to certain investments.  But it's hard to accept the "options are a zero-sum game" argument I hear sometimes.  There are some very valid, non-speculative purposes for using options (such as income generation, risk mitigation, etc.).  But I think Jones just wants to avoid the big "blowup" because they can control it.
 
On the other hand, the majority of traditional advisors around the country don't use most of the things Jones prohibits, so it's not like we are missing THAT much.  But like advisory services (which we never had until last year because they were "unethical" or whatever they said), it is nice to have the ability to offer them under the right circumstances.
 
Really no sense arguing about this.

Moraen's picture
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Joined: 2009-01-22

Spaceman Spiff wrote: So, because you've never met anyone who was interviewed, that means it's rigged?  I've never actually met anyone who won a World Series.  That must mean those are rigged too.  And the one person you know who has been interviewed was coached?  At a different company?  That OBVIOUSLY means that the exact same thing happens at EDJ and all of the other companies that make that list. 
You know what that info means to me?  Nothing.  You have a single instance of coaching and are projecting that instance to all of the other companies.  EDJ specifically because you have a thing against them.  
 
There are (according to Fortune) 34,000 people who work for EDJ.  In your travels you've mabye met 1/100th of them.  I can't say that I know anyone who was interviewed, but that doesn't mean they don't exist.  For all I know they only interview GPs, RLs, department leaders, and team leaders.  They might not interview just the lowly associates. 
 
However, I find it a stretch to assume that it's staged or rigged based on your very limited sample group.  Come back and talk to us when you've found a person at each of the top 10 companies who says they were coached by their PR department. 

Spiff - exactly. If they are not interviewing the associates, how is it an accurate population?

I gave you an example of another company that rigs it, which had nothing to do with Jones. I also have quite a few clients at NetApp who say it's an ok place to work, but they've worked at better places. I find it hard to believe looking at their salaries, the fact that they have Beer Bash Friday's, bagels are given to all employees once a week and security monitors their travel to ensure their safety.

What I am saying is, I think the Fortune mag. survey is a joke. I don't think it's an accurate representation of the employees. For ALL companies... not just Jones.

Moraen's picture
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Joined: 2009-01-22

jkl1v1n6 wrote: Have you ever been in the military?  Ever gone through boot camp?  It's the same psychology at Jones.  Typically they take people who have never been in the business.  They train you in their model and preach "all for one and one for all".  They do a very good job at it.  So does the military.  The pyschology comes from everyone having a shared experience.  Those bonds you build in boot camp are strong, same with Jones training.  You go to St. Louis knowing nothing, are in unfamiliar territory and are in a vulnerable emotional state.  Everyone is feeling the same way. 
 
They build their model on success, meaning those that make it through the first few years will probably make it and have a very good view of the firm.  Maybe not in the current economic times but previously.  If not they will have already left or will be leaving.  Most of these people do not have anything in the industry to compare it to.  So if you do get interviewed you have nothing but glowing reports for the survey. 
 
I think the first couple of years you still believe in the "Jones way", the next few are crucial times, these are the years decisions are made.  Stay in the industry or stay with Jones.  After 5 or more years if you are still with Jones then you are content and will give glowing reports. 
 
My couple of pennies.     

Excellent point. But I still think the Fortune survey is a joke.

norcalstoppy's picture
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Joined: 2008-12-11

So I get the craziest job interview offer over the phone today. His pitch was the funniest thing I've heard in a long time.
 
"Are you still in the market for a new career?" (Yes)
"I see that you have background in banking and financial services. How did that work out for you?"
(Great, blah blah blah...)
"Listen, insurance and retirement planning is something that everyone needs, and that's why it's such a money maker."
(Of course)
"Well, I have an oppotunity here for you to sell something everyone will ultimately need. And with the baby boomer population in retirement or coming into retirement, there's a lot of potential."
(OK...? - I'm thinking that is's another insurance co. or agency)
"We here at **** cemetery is looking for talented salespeople to expand out business."
(Uhhh....what?????....?....?...???!??!!)
"We're the largest single cemetery in the US and we offer very good pricing on spaces and properties for people that are planning early."
(Wow...I'm sorry, but I don't think I'll be interested.)
"Alright. Well, write my name and number down."
(Ok)
"Give me a call if you'd like to start planning for your future."
(..................I'm only in my twenties.....)
"We have excellent financing. And like an insurance or retirement planning, it's good to start planning early."
(No thanks.)
 
 
 
 

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