Monday

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DOWN's picture
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UAE markets limit down Monday
Black Friday Sucked
Mkt broke 1100 Friday ( on what is typically a strong day )
Big banks may be forced to raise capital

It's Gonna get ugly

Shania Twain's picture
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DOWN wrote: UAE markets limit down Monday
Black Friday Sucked
Mkt broke 1100 Friday ( on what is typically a strong day )
Big banks may be forced to raise capital

It's Gonna get ugly

UAE market    funny   priced in camel chips?

dow futures up 40.

here is how u get after hours quotes:

After hours futures quotes

Northfield's picture
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Asia's up 2%.
 
Looks like the rally continues.

DOWN's picture
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Banks Loan Exposure to The UAE (As of 2008)
Bank     Loans to UAE (blns of UAE dirhams)     In dollars (current FX, blns)
HSBC                    62.56     $17.03
Standard Chartered     28.54     $7.77
Barclays             13.14     $3.58
ABN AMRO*             8.23     $2.24
Arab Bank             7.66     $2.09
Citigroup             7.06     $1.92
Bank of Baroda             6.54     $1.78
Bank Saderat Iran     6.38     $1.74
BNP Paribas             6.20     $1.69
Lloyds                    5.77     $1.57

About another 40 billion on the banks books
no big deal that should really get them lending again soon. great news lets buy stocks. Bulls are living in a dream world

Indyone's picture
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Another idiot is born.

BerkshireBull's picture
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Asia EXPLODING higher up nearly 3% and still climbing.Gonna be a GOOD DAY on Monday.  I'm gonna be doing my money dance.

Sportsfreakbob's picture
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It is with great hesitancy that i join this discussion, for fear of giving credibility to the idea of the great coming apocalypse.
Can someone please explain to me the relevance of the price of camels in Dubai, to the need for Americans and the world to consume the products of Abbott Labs, Johnson and Johnson, Intel, Altria and many other great companies that sell products that people need and the relevance of the camels to the time horizon for the average 40-50 year old who needs to retire comfortably and so should be investing in these companies for the next 20 years?
Down, and all your other persona, like meletion shoeshine boy and others, are you delusional enough to really believe that you are all knowing about the markets direction in the next 15 days, and apparently, next 15 minutes. 

Shania Twain's picture
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Joined: 2009-09-23

DOWN wrote: Banks Loan Exposure to The UAE (As of 2008)
Bank     Loans to UAE (blns of UAE dirhams)     In dollars (current FX, blns)
HSBC                     62.56     $17.03
Standard Chartered     28.54     $7.77
Barclays             13.14     $3.58
ABN AMRO*             8.23     $2.24
Arab Bank             7.66     $2.09
Citigroup             7.06     $1.92
Bank of Baroda             6.54     $1.78
Bank Saderat Iran     6.38     $1.74
BNP Paribas             6.20     $1.69
Lloyds                     5.77     $1.57

About another 40 billion on the banks books
no big deal that should really get them lending again soon. great news lets buy stocks. Bulls are living in a dream world

Hey Copernicus:

Country       Abbreviation       Fund               Assets $Billion       Inception       Origin
United Arab Emirates
    Abu Dhabi     ADIA     Abu Dhabi Investment Authority     827     1976     Oil
Norway     GPF     Government Pension Fund - Global        445     1990     Oil
Saudi Arabia     SAMA     SAMA Foreign Holdings             431     n/a     Oil

near a tril.   
this is their pocket change

dubai crap a none event.   
Like your child throwing his rattle for attention.
daddy (uae) picks it up and cleans it off

only thing ugly on monday. is short gld, long usd and short stocks....

(UAE market selling off. sorry brother...but that sfunny)

NYCTrader's picture
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Sportsfreakbob wrote:It is with great hesitancy that i join this discussion, for fear of giving credibility to the idea of the great coming apocalypse.
Can someone please explain to me the relevance of the price of camels in Dubai, to the need for Americans and the world to consume the products of Abbott Labs, Johnson and Johnson, Intel, Altria and many other great companies that sell products that people need and the relevance of the camels to the time horizon for the average 40-50 year old who needs to retire comfortably and so should be investing in these companies for the next 20 years?
Down, and all your other persona, like meletion shoeshine boy and others, are you delusional enough to really believe that you are all knowing about the markets direction in the next 15 days, and apparently, next 15 minutes. Dubai World owns assets all over the world.  If they are forced to liquidate these assets at fire sale prices to pay back creditors it would have a ripple effect across global markets.  Some of the major international assets they own include:Barney's Equity in Standard Chartered, MGM Mirage, HSBC, Deutsche Bank, Perella Weinberg and Sony20% stake in Cirque Du SoleilTurnberry Golf Course in ScotlandQE2 Cruise ship21% stake in London Stock ExchangeIf the UAE backs all their debt, then this will be contained.  If not, there will be problems.  This also raises questions about other emerging market countries will large amounts of debt.   There is concern there will be a domino effect with more countries unable to meet debt obligations (sort of like what we saw with the banks in '08 with Bear Stearns leading the way).  With the banks, the US, UK etc stepped in and bailed them out.  The question is who will bailout the debt of these countries if it comes to that?

Indyone's picture
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DOWN wrote:UAE markets limit down Monday Black Friday Sucked Mkt broke 1100 Friday ( on what is typically a strong day ) Big banks may be forced to raise capital It's Gonna get ugly

 
Oh yes, Chicken Little...the sky did INDEED fall this morning.
 
It's amazing how again and again the doomsayers rise up on this forum and while the wind is at their back, bluster on and on ad nauseum about how we are heading for Armageddon.  It's equally amazing how fast they disappear when the tide turns against them.  You too, will disappear in time.  Meanwhile, we'll all be treated to your infinite "wisdom" about the direction of markets and the global economy, whether we ask for it or not.
 
I'm not stupid enough to make a bold prediction of the short term direction of markets and economies.  What I do know is that we've always had the ingenuity to cope with whatever problem has been set before us...eventually.  I'm a patient and opportunistic investor and my greatest asset has been the ability to tune out kooks on both ends of the spectrum and stay with a general plan of attack.  From time to time, that plan gets tweaked and adjusted a bit, but the basic premises have always stayed intact.  Stock market investing is for time horizons of five years or more.  Dollar cost averaging is a good idea.  People at, near, or in retirement need to take steps to reduce market risk, and so on.  You get the picture.  The idiots who say to load up on gold or tech stocks eventually get their turn in the woodshed.  We all do.  It's my goal to make the trip to the woodshed as painless as possible while preserving the ability to participate in rebounds.  Market timing, except for a few modest tweaks of portfolio allocations, is not a part of my playbook.
 
This is the reason I survived the lost decade...all of it.  Not because I made huge bets in any direction.  Those who continue to make large bets eventually make the wrong bet and wash out of the industry.  For most, it's sooner rather than later, but a few lucky ones hang on for longer than would be expected.  Plenty crow about being able to accurately predict market tops and bottoms, but rare indeed is the timer who can produce a market-beating track record for extended periods of time.  These same hucksters will point to their market-beating performance over the lost decade, which in my opinion is unimpressive in itself.  Overall, my portfolio beat the indexes over the last ten years, but that can be explained by a few simple strategies, such as dollar cost averaging and decent manager performance, along with a few modest tactical shifts.  All you have to do is look at the long-term record of a perma-bear to quickly see that betting against capitalism is a doomed strategy.
 
Bluster on, Dr. Doom...I've tuned out more impressive prognosticators than the anonymous rrmag forum bears.

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Indyone wrote: DOWN wrote:
It's amazing how again and again the doomsayers rise up on this forum and while the wind is at their back, bluster on and on ad nauseum about how we are heading for Armageddon.  It's equally amazing how fast they disappear when the tide turns against them.  You too, will disappear in time.  Meanwhile, we'll all be treated to your infinite "wisdom" about the direction of markets and the global economy, whether we ask for it or not.
 
I'm not stupid enough to make a bold prediction of the short term direction of markets and economies.  What I do know is that we've always had the ingenuity to cope with whatever problem has been set before us...eventually.  I'm a patient and opportunistic investor and my greatest asset has been the ability to tune out kooks on both ends of the spectrum and stay with a general plan of attack.  From time to time, that plan gets tweaked and adjusted a bit, but the basic premises have always stayed intact.  Stock market investing is for time horizons of five years or more.  Dollar cost averaging is a good idea.  People at, near, or in retirement need to take steps to reduce market risk, and so on.  You get the picture.  The idiots who say to load up on gold or tech stocks eventually get their turn in the woodshed.  We all do.  It's my goal to make the trip to the woodshed as painless as possible while preserving the ability to participate in rebounds.  Market timing, except for a few modest tweaks of portfolio allocations, is not a part of my playbook.
 
This is the reason I survived the lost decade...all of it.  Not because I made huge bets in any direction.  Those who continue to make large bets eventually make the wrong bet and wash out of the industry.  For most, it's sooner rather than later, but a few lucky ones hang on for longer than would be expected.  Plenty crow about being able to accurately predict market tops and bottoms, but rare indeed is the timer who can produce a market-beating track record for extended periods of time.  These same hucksters will point to their market-beating performance over the lost decade, which in my opinion is unimpressive in itself.  Overall, my portfolio beat the indexes over the last ten years, but that can be explained by a few simple strategies, such as dollar cost averaging and decent manager performance, along with a few modest tactical shifts.  All you have to do is look at the long-term record of a perma-bear to quickly see that betting against capitalism is a doomed strategy.
 
Bluster on, Dr. Doom...I've tuned out more impressive prognosticators than the anonymous rrmag forum bears.

this is the post of the decade.   amen brother

"trip to woodshed less painless"

perfect

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NYCTrader wrote: Sportsfreakbob wrote:It is with great hesitancy that i join this discussion, for fear of giving credibility to the idea of the great coming apocalypse.
Can someone please explain to me the relevance of the price of camels in Dubai, to the need for Americans and the world to consume the products of Abbott Labs, Johnson and Johnson, Intel, Altria and many other great companies that sell products that people need and the relevance of the camels to the time horizon for the average 40-50 year old who needs to retire comfortably and so should be investing in these companies for the next 20 years?
Down, and all your other persona, like meletion shoeshine boy and others, are you delusional enough to really believe that you are all knowing about the markets direction in the next 15 days, and apparently, next 15 minutes. Dubai World owns assets all over the world.  If they are forced to liquidate these assets at fire sale prices to pay back creditors it would have a ripple effect across global markets.  Some of the major international assets they own include:Barney's Equity in Standard Chartered, MGM Mirage, HSBC, Deutsche Bank, Perella Weinberg and Sony20% stake in Cirque Du SoleilTurnberry Golf Course in ScotlandQE2 Cruise ship21% stake in London Stock ExchangeIf the UAE backs all their debt, then this will be contained.  If not, there will be problems.  This also raises questions about other emerging market countries will large amounts of debt.   There is concern there will be a domino effect with more countries unable to meet debt obligations (sort of like what we saw with the banks in '08 with Bear Stearns leading the way).  With the banks, the US, UK etc stepped in and bailed them out.  The question is who will bailout the debt of these countries if it comes to that?
And this will all be temporary, because the world will not come to an end. People will still buy qtips, drugs that save lives, and oil. This is no different than the Russian currency crisis, the Asian Contagion, or any of the other 1001 events that the doomsters were screaming would bring down the free world as we know it.
 
I'm not saying to just sit and hold and buy EVERY dip. There is nothing wrong with being tactical around the fringes of your core. But to move portfolios into cash, treasuries and the dollar 100% as some of the jackasses on this board are suggesting, no, are pounding the table with, would be irresponsible, as a prudent advisor

Magician's picture
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Best cyber-monday ever anyone?

Didn't I say the dynamic had changed? In-store Black Friday, up .5% from last year. Paltry. Internet Black Friday sales up 11%.    

Most retailers with an online storefront - between 25 and 35%.

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B24
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People just don't shop in stores anymore.  Measuring the number of shoppers in physical stores is pointless these days.  Any links to hwre you can find current and historical retail numbers?

Shania Twain's picture
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NYCTrader wrote:
Sportsfreakbob wrote:?

D Dubai World owns assets all over the world.  If they are forced to liquidate these assets at fire sale prices to pay back creditors it would have a ripple effect across global markets.  Some of the major international assets they own include:Barney's Equity in Standard Chartered, MGM Mirage, HSBC, Deutsche Bank, Perella Weinberg and Sony20% stake in Cirque Du SoleilTurnberry Golf Course in ScotlandQE2 Cruise ship21% stake in London Stock ExchangeIf the UAE backs all their debt, then this will be contained.  If not, there will be problems.  This also raises questions about other emerging market countries will large amounts of debt.   There is concern there will be a domino effect with more countries unable to meet debt obligations (sort of like what we saw with the banks in '08 with Bear Stearns leading the way).  With the banks, the US, UK etc stepped in and bailed them out.  The question is who will bailout the debt of these countries if it comes to that?

Dubai....funny

your looking out back window brother

"Financials rise, Goldman says loss cycle near end "

The next thing to get us (prolly 20 plus years from now) WONT be this.

Dubai World is a fukcing side show.   non-event.    capitialism working

These stupid &%$ &^%$ build something that does not make economic sense.

Oct. 5, 2009, 8:11 a.m. EDT · Recommend (3) · Post:   

Goldman Sachs ups large U.S. banks to attractiveRelated stories
Financials rise, Goldman says loss cycle near end (4:02p)
U.S. Steel catches praise on overseas projects (1:54p)
Dow closes up as Dubai fears wane (6:01p)
AIG sinks as analyst calls its reserves deficient (12:49p)
Story
Quotes
Comments Screener (74) Alert Email Print ShareBy Greg Morcroft, MarketWatch
NEW YORK (MarketWatch) -- Analysts at Goldman Sachs got more optimistic about large U.S. banks Monday, raising their coverage view on the sector to attractive from neutral.

Among specific names, they upgraded Wells Fargo & Co. /quotes/comstock/13*!wfc/quotes/nls/wfc (WFC 28.02, -0.02, -0.07%) to buy and Comerica Inc. /quotes/comstock/13*!cma/quotes/nls/cma (CMA 28.47, +0.67, +2.41%) to neutral.

They added Capital One Financial Corp. /quotes/comstock/13*!cof/quotes/nls/cof (COF 38.26, -0.10, -0.26%) to their conviction buy list, which also includes J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. /quotes/comstock/13*!jpm/quotes/nls/jpm (JPM 42.32, -0.17, -0.40%) and Bank of America Corp. /quotes/comstock/13*!bac/quotes/nls/bac (BAC 15.83, -0.02, -0.13%) .

"The market has failed to recognize the dramatic improvement in earnings power at the large banks versus the regionals," they wrote, adding that, "We believe this difference in earnings power has not been fully reflected in share prices."

Wells Fargo upgraded to buy, conviction on Capital One
Goldman's team lifted Wells Fargo to buy from neutral, saying that the bank's capital position is improving and it stands to reap big rewards form its distressed takeover of Wachovia Corp.

"Wells is the big winner this cycle on change in tangible assets per share, up 70% from the second quarter of 2007 to the second quarter of 2009. The reason is simple: Wells bought Wachovia at a depressed price," the analysts said.

Goldman added banking and credit card firm Capital One to its Conviction Buy list. It said the company's consumer credit problems are moderating and the analysts expect a positive revenue surprise for upcoming third quarter results.

"Tangible assets per share have not changed and consumer credit is moderating," the researchers said. "We think third quarter revenues will be better than expected leading investors to revise up normalized EPS to over $5, leaving the stock at 6 times normalized (earnings), versus 9 times for regionals."

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iceco1d wrote: My wife made me go Black Friday shopping this year...first time for me.  Last time for me.  What insanity to save a few bucks!  Never, ever, ever, ever, again.

You are so right.   insane

welcome back iceman

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iceco1d wrote: My wife made me go Black Friday shopping this year...first time for me.  Last time for me.  What insanity to save a few bucks!  Never, ever, ever, ever, again.

I was sitting in a GD tree stand in Necedah, WI freezing my ass off. But I wouldn't have traded places with you for the world.

Thank God my wife shops online.

Shania Twain's picture
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I got a 10 pointer in black river state forest in 1977.

U shoot a buck?

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Ferris Bueller wrote:We should start the RRMAG forums contrarian fund. Anything these morons think, do the opposite.
 
Amen.

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Sportsfreakbob wrote:NYCTrader wrote: Sportsfreakbob wrote:It is with great hesitancy that i join this discussion, for fear of giving credibility to the idea of the great coming apocalypse.
Can someone please explain to me the relevance of the price of camels in Dubai, to the need for Americans and the world to consume the products of Abbott Labs, Johnson and Johnson, Intel, Altria and many other great companies that sell products that people need and the relevance of the camels to the time horizon for the average 40-50 year old who needs to retire comfortably and so should be investing in these companies for the next 20 years?
Down, and all your other persona, like meletion shoeshine boy and others, are you delusional enough to really believe that you are all knowing about the markets direction in the next 15 days, and apparently, next 15 minutes. Dubai World owns assets all over the world.  If they are forced to liquidate these assets at fire sale prices to pay back creditors it would have a ripple effect across global markets.  Some of the major international assets they own include:Barney's Equity in Standard Chartered, MGM Mirage, HSBC, Deutsche Bank, Perella Weinberg and Sony20% stake in Cirque Du SoleilTurnberry Golf Course in ScotlandQE2 Cruise ship21% stake in London Stock ExchangeIf the UAE backs all their debt, then this will be contained.  If not, there will be problems.  This also raises questions about other emerging market countries will large amounts of debt.   There is concern there will be a domino effect with more countries unable to meet debt obligations (sort of like what we saw with the banks in '08 with Bear Stearns leading the way).  With the banks, the US, UK etc stepped in and bailed them out.  The question is who will bailout the debt of these countries if it comes to that?
And this will all be temporary, because the world will not come to an end. People will still buy qtips, drugs that save lives, and oil. This is no different than the Russian currency crisis, the Asian Contagion, or any of the other 1001 events that the doomsters were screaming would bring down the free world as we know it.
 
I'm not saying to just sit and hold and buy EVERY dip. There is nothing wrong with being tactical around the fringes of your core. But to move portfolios into cash, treasuries and the dollar 100% as some of the jackasses on this board are suggesting, no, are pounding the table with, would be irresponsible, as a prudent advisorLet me first say that I don't think the world is coming to an end.  I also don't think you should ever be invested 100% in anything, especially not cash.I totally agree with you on being tactical and having a core strategy.  Particularly when it comes to client assets.  Yes, there are a quite a few jackasses on this board (bulls and bears alike), but it's true of our business as a whole. In no way do I advocate being in 100% treasuries right now, but at the same time, I think it's reckless to be in 100% stock right now (or even 80% for that matter).  Particularly with client assets.  This is how books are blown up.  In general, with client assets, I tend to air on the side of being conservative -- I would much rather miss out on an up move and preserve capital than take risks and lose big.  Clients hire me to protect their money, not lose it playing hunches.  They took risks in their professional careers and businesses.  They don't need me to originate their wealth.  They already had it long before they met me.Now, with my own money, I will take more risk.  And with this market I am not convinced we are anywhere close to being out of the woods.   This Dubai situation could be the tip of the iceberg.  Will we reach a point where other countries and some US municipalities and states start to default on their debt?  I don't know.  I hope not.  It seems pretty far fetched right now, but you remember 2008?  If I had told you in 2007 that Lehman, Bear Stearns, WaMu, AIG, Wachovia and Merrill would collapse within the year, would you believe me?  Probably not.  I wouldn't have believed it either.  That doesn't mean it's outside the realm of possibility.  Or that we shouldn't look for warning signs and prepare for it in the event it does happen.I try to maintain a healthy skepticism when I look at the markets.  That's what I'm paid to do.  Being bullish is great and is often the right course of action.  But you can't be a bull 100% of the time.  Just like you can't be a bear 100% of the time.  There is room for nuance.  Right now, I'm bearish.  If I'm wrong, no big deal.  My clients missed out on some upside.   But if I'm an all in bull right now and I'm wrong, the stakes are much higher.  Why put your clients, your business and your reputation at that kind of risk?  Especially given what's happened over the past 18 months.  If you're wrong about this recovery, why would they ever trust you again?  Conviction is great, but the markets are unpredictable and you never know what's around the corner.  If there are warning signs that things could take a turn for the worse (and my God, if this Dubai situation isn't a gigantic flashing red neon sign, then I don't know what is) -- don't you think your clients would appreciate hearing "I'm looking at the markets right now and I don't like what I see.  Let's take some risk of the table"  instead of "Dubai is an isolated event.  We're in a V-shaped recovery!!  This is the start of the new bull market.  Nothing to worry about!!"   I know my clients would prefer to hear the first answer over the second.  That's what you're there for.  Any dumbass can be a perma-bull.  But these people trust you with their wealth.  They want to know that you are looking out for them and you are going to be prudent and responsible, not reckless.  Look, at the end of the day, all you have is your integrity.  If you truly believe that we are in a V-shaped recovery and you can make your clients a killing by buying stock, then go all in.  Just make sure they understand the risks involved in being this agressive.  And more importantly, make sure you're right.  Because if you're not, I don't think your clients will have a whole lot of sympathy or really care anymore about why your bullish case is so bulletproof (although I'm sure the arbitration panel will want to hear all about it).

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NYCTrader wrote:
Sportsfreakbob wrote:NYCTrader wrote: I also don't think you should ever be invested 100% in anything, especially not cash.I totally agree with you on being tactical and having a core strategy.  but it's true of our business as a whole. In no way do I advocate being in 100% treasuries right now, but at the same time, I think it's reckless to be in 100% stock right now (or even 80% for that matter).  Particularly with client assets.  This is how books are blown up.  In general, with client assets, I tend to air on the side of being conservative -- I would much rather miss out on an up move and preserve capital .

I am a raging bull for many reasons.

But ANY discussion assumes that the work has been done to determine the proper asset allocation parameters that make sense for each client.
Nothing happens in my team UNTIL this is done COMPLETELY.

This was a given.    

It is THE core of the value prop that we bring to the table.

Im not trying to be Mr bad ass but I wont do business with someone unless I know their deal. all of it.

(27 years ago when I started cold calling, if you had a pulse and said Yes"   the confirm was in the mail.   Not now)    

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NYCTrader - Great post - this is what this board should be about. Constructive discussion.
My comments about a portfolio of treasuires , the dollar, etc, was not directed at you. It was directed at the jackasses.
To make a long story short, i would describe myself right now as being cautiously optimistic, with "cautiously" being the operative word. So we are not far apart.
I see this Dubai situation as serious, but not a new crisis, more a continuation of the old.
I do think we will probably ssee things we havent seen in the past, before this is over. Like muni debt defaults going relatively  high (relative to the historical miniscule default rate.
For clients who have a 10-20 year time horizon i am comforrtable owning quality stocks right now, that was the point of my post. Of course, along with that, comes the need to manage expectations in a big way, because all clients who have that kind of time horizon, suddenly forget about it when their portfolios blip down 10%

Moraen's picture
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Shania Twain wrote:I got a 10 pointer in black river state forest in 1977.

U shoot a buck?Nothing but deer tracks on two twelve-hour days.  It was all over the news up there that no one was getting a damn thing.  We had a break on Thanksgiving, when my wife and kid made dinner, but other than that, nice and quiet.I did get a boar in the Bahamas several years back.  They still use spears.

Shania Twain's picture
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I have a few clients in wisc
 
isnt there a huge problem with white tail population way down?

Moraen's picture
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Shania Twain wrote:I have a few clients in wisc
 
isnt there a huge problem with white tail population way down?I thought so.  But I don't live there.  Just my wife's family.

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From:  http://www.american-hunter.com/field_dressing.htm
 
Field Dressing First cut 1) position the deer on its back with the head uphill if possible. Gravity is a useful tool in field dressing. 2) Your first cut needs to be to circle the a*** freeing the anal tract not only from the hide but the membranes that hold it in place to the pelvic bone. This is where a small 3-4 inch blade shows its usefulness. 3) once the anal tract is free  you can pull it out of the deer and tie it closed to insure the fecal matter will not spill out and contaminate your meat. 4) in the case of a doe the urethra can be circled along with the a*** at this same time and tied.
 
They lost me at step 2.

Shania Twain's picture
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iceco1d wrote: Oh hunting season....
 
You stand in the freezing cold, sometimes rain, for 12 freaking hours, by yourself...your reward for success?  Playing in deer blood, cutting out intestines, and chopping deer testicles off so they don't give the meat that "game" flavor.  Awesome.  The bonus round is NOT getting any deer tics on you. 
 
A lot of my friends hunt...not for me though. 

The smell.....

ramming your hand up to pull out "parts".....

The gizz on your arm freezes....

dragging the damn thing for miles.....

"thawing" in the car and those smells.....

its a wonderful thing

Moraen's picture
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Hey, where's mel?Isn't the crash imminent?

Shania Twain's picture
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Moraen wrote: Hey, where's mel?Isn't the crash imminent?

margin call

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Moraen wrote:Hey, where's mel?Isn't the crash imminent?
 
BANNED.
 
To be fair, he was only 15% off with his November Close prediction.

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IP ban?15%, 20%, I guess it doesn't really matter.

SometimesNowhere's picture
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Moraen wrote:IP ban?15%, 20%, I guess it doesn't really matter.
 
I guess he'll have to go to another public library to do his posting.

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Joined: 2008-11-13

Moraen wrote:IP ban?15%, 20%, I guess it doesn't really matter.
 
I believe so.  Got a PM from the admin today claiming that's he/she is banned.  I think his posts are now labeled as "Troll", but I could just be not paying attention.

Wet_Blanket's picture
Offline
Joined: 2008-11-13

To beat a dead horse.
 
Posted November 3, 2009:
 
 
Meletio wrote:OK her's some guidance ...over the past week or so 90 % of the economic numbers and earnings have beat expectations. ( some even on the top line ) and the mkt can't hold a rally. That tells me that you should protect your gains if you have them. Buy some SDS or SH ( non leveraged ) and keep it in your account. Use your other $ to trade the bounces. That way if you are wrong you make money on the shorts. Don't worry about taking a bath on the shorts b/c we probably do not have too much upside in the mkt.  Ok now for the humor. some people on this forum are so incredibly stupid that I am starting to question evolution.
 
Date     Symbol    Price
11/3     SH           $56.52
11/30   SH           $53.67

Mr. Sunshine's picture
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Joined: 2009-08-05

Meletio,

Our firm is sponsoring a huge meals-on-wheels program. PM me your address, and I'll sign you up for a bird and some taters.

note- when you answer the door, DON'T tell the driver you live with your parents. One gift basket per household head.

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