Yet another leaving edward jones thread

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jwfrog2000's picture
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Joined: 2010-03-08

So I'll be the first to admit I just can't hack it.  Being a broker just isn't for me.  So here's my story.I came to Edward Jones after graduate school basically because I was moving to a new town and the job search via another state was difficult.  My education and sales background seemed to match well with Edward Jones so I signed the offer letter and began my journey.  I have to say the EDJ provides some of the best training and support I have ever seen.  I have no malice toward the company.  My RL, field trainers and colleagues have been tremendous.  Also, I have been beyond exceeding expectations during my 10 months of selling and I have qualified for all of the bonuses.  I just don't think being a broker is what I was meant to do.Here are some of my hang-ups about the job:One FA office- I love, love, love my BOA, but I think we are more best friends than co-workers.  I miss working in a busy environment with a lot of people.  I understand you have client meetings, etc. but still, what can I say,  I guess I am a corporate drown.  Conflict of interest-  I am supposed to be doing what's right for the client while meeting my sales goals.  I have never been one to hard-sell anyone.  Sometimes I just feel cheap about my jobSo I am seg 5, then what- While I like money it is something that has never truly motivated me.  I just got back from the spring regional and everyone is talking about what drives them everyday and I can't really think of anything.  Working at EDJ simply isn't my passion.  So I wake up a few years from now with some bucks in the bank..who cares?So now, I am struggling with this huge sense of guilt because this company and the people in it have been fantastic to me.  I have decided to pursue my true passion which is a career in education.  I know it seems like a complete 180 but I know in my heart it is what I am truly good at and it will make me happy.  How and when do I leave gracefully?  I think it is a little terrible to stay on at this job and open new accounts when I know I'm not going to be here in a few months. Also, what are the logistics of leaving. Do I call my DL or my RL.  I can't exactly Jones Google, "giving resignation notification".  Thank you in advance for the civil and helpful comments

gethardgetraw's picture
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Joined: 2009-10-22

I've sounded exactly like that on so many occassions and I'm almost at the exact same position for the same amount of time at EDJ as you.  Here are my thoughts on the matter: gethardgetraw wrote: I was 100% committed to quitting. I attempted to stop production for a solid 45 days and my hopes were to drop production so EDJ would fire me rather than me quitting. My thought process was that, in the long run, I didn't want to have a career that required me having to constantly *ask* for people's business. I could be an analyst, or an investment banker, or start in the mail room at a hedge fund perhaps. Out of the gates I could be making 4x more than I am right now and it's guaranteed; salary. Then I had an epiphany. I've been looking at it all wrong. This job blows hard for a very long time. 3 years maybe. Then, you cross into the threshold of making more money than the analyst AND you're the boss. You come in when you want. You golf when you want. And not only are you now making more, you can make as much as you damn well please.  As far as having to *ask* people for their business. ANY sales job requires this. This is why we're paid the big bucks. This is why after 10-15 years in the business, we practically make 100k/yr OFF OF TRAILS ALONE. You don't have to even step into your office (exaggeration... I know).  My point being, I've got it all. I've got my own office with 2 windows. A huge desk; not some cubicle. I can listen to the music of my choice whenever I damn well please while at work. My own assistant. Who else has this in their mid-20's? More importantly, however, is that I am actually making peoples' lives better. I am giving them peace of mind with regards to their retirement. You can make $1 million a year gambling, slingin' crack rock, or having a wicked jump shot, but you're not adding anything to society.  I thought long and hard about this, and this is what I want to do. Is it the fast-paced day-trading derivatives, commodities, etc that I pictured I'd be doing while studying finance in college? No. I've got more than that. I'm able to be an esteemed person of my community. We have jobs that people refer to as "having a guy for that." Doctors and lawyers don't handle the CASH, we do.  Remember, you run your business the way you want it to be run. If you want a sales job, make it a sales job. Cold call boiler room style day in and day out. Some people love that.If you don't want to be viewed as a salesman, focus on retirement planning. Handle peoples' nest eggs. Give them peace of mind when it comes to their retirement. You're definitely doing a lot of good in peoples' lives, and you're not out in the community anxious for the next $5k sale. Remember though, you have to first turn them into a client, and that's generally making that first, small sale. Then show them what you can really do.  Although if it's education that you want to pursue, do what makes you happy. There's definitely more to life than a fat checking account. It makes life more comfortable, but there's nothing more comfortable than doing what you love day in a day out, regardless of the pay.

B24's picture
B24
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Joined: 2008-07-08

JW,Once you're ready to go, call your regional leader and tell him.  He will tell you what you need to do.  Be honest with him, and leave gracefully (as you have said).  That will help them take care of your clients better (rather than scrambling for a replacement).  However, I am fairly certain that there is no "notice" - you will be asked to leave immediately.  That's just the industry, not Jones, so don't be offended.As far as "when" to move - only you can decide.  Don't feel bad about opening accounts.  They can still get service from Jones and whoever replaces you.  Just do what you think is right - the clients will be fine.  There is no "moral issue" with hanging on for a while, even though you want to leave.  This isn't a marriage.  As long as you are fulfilling your obligation to do the right thing for clients and for Jones, you don't have to plan to stay forever for it to be "ethical".  If I were you, I would stay until you find another job.  At least you have some income and benefits, and a flexible schedule.

Roxie's picture
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Joined: 2009-10-19

It has always been amazing to me the overlap between teaching and financial advisors.  Can't tell you how many people that I talked to in my recruiting time that had a teaching background.  I think it is because in a way being a financial advisor is teaching people about money and themselves.  In the meantime if you are going to stick around for a bit, get on the list of adult classes at your local high school and teach financial planning, that way you can try out teaching first and get paid for it.Whatever you do, best of luck, it is never an easy decision. 

chief123's picture
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Joined: 2008-10-28

jwfrog2000 wrote:So I'll be the first to admit I just can't hack it.  Being a broker just isn't for me.  So here's my story.I came to Edward Jones after graduate school basically because I was moving to a new town and the job search via another state was difficult.  My education and sales background seemed to match well with Edward Jones so I signed the offer letter and began my journey.  I have to say the EDJ provides some of the best training and support I have ever seen.  I have no malice toward the company.  My RL, field trainers and colleagues have been tremendous.  Also, I have been beyond exceeding expectations during my 10 months of selling and I have qualified for all of the bonuses.  I just don't think being a broker is what I was meant to do.Here are some of my hang-ups about the job:One FA office- I love, love, love my BOA, but I think we are more best friends than co-workers.  I miss working in a busy environment with a lot of people.  I understand you have client meetings, etc. but still, what can I say,  I guess I am a corporate drown.  Conflict of interest-  I am supposed to be doing what's right for the client while meeting my sales goals.  I have never been one to hard-sell anyone.  Sometimes I just feel cheap about my jobSo I am seg 5, then what- While I like money it is something that has never truly motivated me.  I just got back from the spring regional and everyone is talking about what drives them everyday and I can't really think of anything.  Working at EDJ simply isn't my passion.  So I wake up a few years from now with some bucks in the bank..who cares?So now, I am struggling with this huge sense of guilt because this company and the people in it have been fantastic to me.  I have decided to pursue my true passion which is a career in education.  I know it seems like a complete 180 but I know in my heart it is what I am truly good at and it will make me happy.  How and when do I leave gracefully?  I think it is a little terrible to stay on at this job and open new accounts when I know I'm not going to be here in a few months. Also, what are the logistics of leaving. Do I call my DL or my RL.  I can't exactly Jones Google, "giving resignation notification".  Thank you in advance for the civil and helpful comments Thanks for wasting my time with the worst post ever..

navet's picture
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Joined: 2010-02-25

My first inclination was to take a giant dump on this post. But something about it concerns me. I am hearing depression talking, and that could be serious. It's important to take an honest look at your motivation. One thing is certain, no job will MAKE you happy. Hapiness only comes from within. If this sense of unhapiness has happened before, then you really need to have it evaluated. Another thing to look at is your relationships. A great relationship with a spouse or significant other will go a long way to giving you a sense of fulfillment. You seem to be looking for something to be passionate about, however, if education is your passion, then why didn't you pursue it before? Spend, some time, destress, and talk with someone you trust. Depression is a life threatening illness and needs to be taken seriously, but without guilt. Everyone experiences it sometime in their lives. Give yourself a little break. Take care.

fa09's picture
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Joined: 2009-06-03

Here is a suggestion... visit www.ja.org it is a volunteer site where they give u materials to volunteer your time to teach a basic 1 dat a week for 6 weeks course in finance and economics to any age you choose from grades k-12. It would be a great way to help you fill the teaching void you have, do it with a flexible schedule and still earn a great living and have a great career. Not to mention it will help if you want to hunt for 403b's from the teachers of the classrooms you teach at. Its a great and rewarding experience I recommend it highly as I have done it myself.

gb0413's picture
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Joined: 2009-07-21

i think everyone knows better than to listen to anything that navet has to say....what an idiot

jwfrog2000's picture
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Joined: 2010-03-08

Navet, thank you for being kind with your comments.  However, let me give you a little background on myself.  I'm 28, unmarried with no kids.  However, I have a very close relationships with my parents and extended family.  I am also of the philosphy that no person should complete you, they should complement you so I doubt getting a boyfriend at this point is going to make me love my job.  Also, I am not expected a job to "make me happy" but I do think going to college and picking a major at 18 can set you on a life path that you weren't really prepared for.  I think going through a little self-exploration and discovering what you really want to do with your life is okay at my age.  Does anybody really ever know what they want to be when they grown up?  As far as why I never pursued teaching before, I'm really not sure.  I was a business major in college and then I went and got my MBA so I guess I thought I needed to find a job that could make me a lot of money.  Also, I have parents who require my financial support so I suppose I felt pressure to be financially stable at a very young age.  Now I'm beginning to realize that I am the one who has to live my life so I am exploring what I truly have a passion for.  Who knows...maybe I'll wake up 5 years from now and want to be a photographer or a zooligist.  That's just me.  I'd rather have an interesting journey for people to write about then sit behind a desk for 20 years selling A-shares

navet's picture
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Joined: 2010-02-25

gbo413, if stupid were a virtue, you'd be a saint.

Spaceman Spiff's picture
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Joined: 2006-08-08

frog - if you want stories for you memoirs, stick with the job that you have.  I have the same desire to teach that you do.  I choose, however, to do it in the business world rather than academia.  Seminars, appointments, volunteer positions, speaking engagements, etc all give you the chance to get your fix of teaching, but yet keep your financial freedom.  I know you probably don't see it much as a new FA, but you do make really good money doing this job.  I think fa09 gave you some good advice with Junior Achievement.  That might be another area to excercise those teaching chops.  The thing about this industry is that once you get established and have a good practice sustaining itself, you can do whatever you want in your free time.  Want to take up photography?  Great!  Take the next bonus, buy youself the biggest camera you can handle and go on a two week trip to the Amazon (and satisfy that zoology bug at the same time) and snap away.  Your clients and your practice will be there when  you get back.  You don't have that freedom in a purely academic setting.  First because you're stuck in  your classroom, second because you won't have the cash to do it.   You need to do what makes you happy.  If it's not being an FA with Jones, there are a lot of other firms out there.  If it's not this industry at all, there are still good jobs out there for the right people.  Good luck.

navet's picture
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Joined: 2010-02-25

Spaceman makes a good point. I've heard of a number of advisors that built a book teaching investment classes at the local JC or library. Women and investing is a big issue right now. Many women will outlive their husbands and they need someone they can trust to show them the way. Younger women need to be independent. That may keep them out of abusive relationships. What they all need is a trusted teacher. The opportunity here may be greater than in a school. I think you can make it work for you. Just a suggestion, good luck.

B24's picture
B24
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Joined: 2008-07-08

I could care less, but it seems that you guys are missing her point.  It appears that she just doesn't like the business.  She's being honest.  I mean seriously, you flame guys for coming on here all excited about the business and everything, you tell them they'll never make it in this business and to pack it in.  And then the first time someone comes on her and says "I just don't want to work in this business anymore" you flame the crap out of her and try to convince her to tough it out and go mentor some Boy Scouts.  What gives?

navet's picture
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Joined: 2010-02-25

Anyone who never seriously considers quitting, has no business doing this for a living. The young big-mouthed so called studs in this industry need to have their asses kicked. They are obnoxious and down right dangerous. Many are spoiled little sh-ts. This post concerned me. So I responded. It was a refreshing change from the gat-hard-get-raw loser that makes me sick. What kind of jackass would use that name? Probably splits his time between here and the porn site while sitting in his parents basement.

Lawrence's picture
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Joined: 2010-01-04

I think this is a great post. It is clear she is doing what needs to be done; but there is something unsatisfying about where she is at. Most people have been in this position at least a few times in their professional lives. Given the time and success you have had so far, I would strongly recommend not making the switch to a new field quite yet. Or at least try to figure out what it is that you really don't like about your current position. As someone else said - being an FA is "teaching". There are strong parallels. You could easliy make it into a "teaching" job. There's something else there (other than depression) that is not right for you. As I've said in other threads, I don't think I could ever work at Jones. I am a social person; I enjoy interacting with others throughout the day. I would find being holed up in a Jones office to be unsatisfying. This could be part of your issue. (I also think Jones reps drink all day long...but that's for another thread)I also agree that just trying to build a bigger pile of money is unsatisfying. So, you need to find some other reason to motivate yourself. My goal over the next 10 years is to earn a PhD - and I believe being an FA is the best way for me to support myself while I do this. I also love that I can go to my kids school plays, etc. any time I want - I don't even have to ask permission. I don't love cold-calling...but I love the quality of life that cold calling gets me. all the best, L 

Coolaid's picture
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Joined: 2008-10-31

Frogger ,,, if I had a dollar for every time that I had felt that at Jones I could retire today.   I also watched a good chunk of those that I started with feel the same thing.  Most of us have bounced into doing things we love in the industry or in a different industry.  If there is one thing that working at Jones teaches you it’s to know who you are.  You don’t have a choice.  They are so busy telling you who you are that you either have to agree or say “Wait a minute!  That’s not me at all!!” I left Jones, stayed with the career, found the company that fit and now love what I do.   Good luck! 

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