Staying Cool at the Door

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kujhawks300's picture
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Any of you veterans have some advice on how to stay cool (er) while door knocking in the summer.  I had to call it quits at about 2:00 PM the other day because I was sweating too much.  I don't want to have to just do the 9:00 to 11:00 AM because door knocking is so good.
 
 

Magician's picture
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Did you just say "door knocking is so good"?

If that is the case for you, then go at night, or bring several changes of shirts. the four weeks i did it, I ruined 14 ties. Wait until August, you're going to die.

Also, bring some water. And get in your car to cool off.

snaggletooth's picture
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Carry an umbrella for the sun.

imabroker's picture
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I wore a polo shirt and a nice pair of khakis.  I figured the look was better than a sweaty mess with a discolored tie.  I think people were also less convinced that I wasn't a Jehovah's witness.  On cooler days or for businesses, I always did the tie thing.  Either way, it was hot!  If you're like me and were a little nervous as well it was even worse.
 
Good luck! 
 
By the way, it really does work.  I was more of a skeptic than most.  This month I opened two households that I door-knocked two summers ago.  One of them is even a good one!

hawse771's picture
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The FA i talked to said he used to leave his car running and would walk up one side of the street and then get in his car to cool off before doing the other side. If you have a car with a remote entry you can just take it off the keychain and keep the car locked so you dont have to worry about someone stealing it. This is in texas so we get plenty of 100 degree days with high humidity. He also said he would carry around a towel to pat his forehead with just as the prospects were opening the door to milk it lol. He said other people only would walk the side with shade covering it etc etc.

now_indy's picture
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I would recommend parking your car, door knocking four houses (two on each side of the street), and then getting back in your car, driving two houses down, and doing the whole thing over again.  Getting in and out of your car with the AC on full blast is SO much better than parking in one spot and hitting like twenty houses in a row.  That way, you can keep your water in the car.  Also, if you have any handouts, I would only carry up to four at a time. The sweat from your hands will ruin a stack of handouts.
 
We had a guy in our region door knocking in a full suit in August. He said he decided to go in when he started SLURRING HIS WORDS!  That's messed up.

apprentice's picture
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5 Ways to Maximize 'Hot Day' Door Knocking:
 
1 - wear two t-shirts under your white short sleeved shirt (with tie)
2 - avoid mid afternoon sun, knock between 8:00pm and 6:00am
3 - go to trailer parks and apartments to avoid long distances between doors
4 - wear hat with the two drink holders (and straw) to stay hydrated
5 - do something more productive to prospect (like a professional, not an amateur)
 
Oh - and ALWAYS bring chocolate chip cookies!
 

Bull&Bear's picture
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Try to hit residential areas (retirees) earlier in the morning or late afternoon.  Don't believe the "not going to door-knock during the dinner hours".  You'll catch a lot of folks home.  Hit the business during hot of the day - right after lunch.

Broker24's picture
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Try the khaki/golf shirt thing.  I found people were MUCH less intimidated, as I didn't have a suit on.  And it was much cooler.

Spaceman Spiff's picture
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I've done plenty of doorknocking during the hot months.  Missouri isn't as bad as it is down south, but we still get some warm ones. 
Water is essential.  I have a water bottle that clips onto my belt.  I carry it with me every time I go doorknocking.  I've left it behind on accident a couple of times and was miserable after about 10 doors. 
 
I too wear polo shirts when it gets warm.  I'd rather people see me in a polo shirt than with pit stained sweat soaked shirts and ties.  And I'm not about to put on a short sleeve dress shirt.  Maybe it's TMI, but I also wear boxers that let the boys breathe a bit so that I don't get that...well, that's enough of that in mixed company.
 
9-11 is my prime doorknocking time in the summer.  By 11 it's getting pretty warm.  I can head back home for a quick change of clothes or back to the office to cool off.  I can stand anything for those two hours.  Beyond that it just gets silly. 
 
You also have to remind yourself that it won't last forever.  You won't have to doorknock every summer for the rest of your life.  Also thinking that behind each door might be that next million dollar account helps too.  It sucks doorknocking in the summer, but just push through it and you'll be asking how do you doorknock in the snow before you know it.    

JollyRoger's picture
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5 - do something more productive to prospect (like a professional, not an amateur)

 
I don't work for EJ, but what are examples of professional ways of prospecting, rather than the amateur way of door knocking.

saul4paul's picture
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I agree with Spiff, water is the key. When I used to door knock(sold vacs) I wore one of those Razorback helments that held a bottle of water on each side both had straws. And when you find someone that opens the door, just ask if you can refill your bottles. But I didn't worry about changing clothes, they would just get soaked too.

Greenbacks's picture
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Take a back pack.
 A water camel under or over your suit 
 

babbling looney's picture
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Ha! I had just the opposite door knocking experience in my beginning days.  January. In the snow. Temperature about 32 to 36.   I did get lots of people inviting me inside for hot coffee and cocoa though   I'm sure they thought I was insane.

snaggletooth's picture
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babbling looney wrote:Ha! I had just the opposite door knocking experience in my beginning days.  January. In the snow. Temperature about 32 to 36.   I did get lots of people inviting me inside for hot coffee and cocoa though   I'm sure they thought I was insane.
 
How much do you think them inviting you in was as a result of you being of the female persuasion?  As a guy, I wouldn't think I would have the same success of being invited in...not even close.

GT Key's picture
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I had the most success door knocking when I wore pants. The times I didn't I got many strange looks.
 
In all seriousness.... I know some guys say don't wear a polo, but I disagree. You look like a goon pitting out. Wear a nice polo, nice pants and bring something to wipe your forehead with that can fit in your pocket. Hit 50-75 doors between 9-11am, talk to 10-15 people, add your 3 good ones and grab some lunch, the remainder of the day will be much easier.

imabroker's picture
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Spiff, good idea on the boxers...  Chicks dig me, because I rarely wear underwear and when I do it's usually something unusual.

 
I can't resist the occasional "Stripes" quote!

doberman's picture
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Who says it has to be just "residential" door knocking? Save the residential door knocking for the cooler parts of the day, then switch to shopping centers and malls for business cold walks, for the hotter parts of the day.
 
Ideally, your marketing schedule should take into account various types of weather. For example, if it rains for a couple days straight, what would you do?

anonymous's picture
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"I don't work for EJ, but what are examples of professional ways of prospecting, rather than the amateur way of door knocking."
 
Let me tell you what is professional.  A professional is someone who helps someone accomplish their goals.  It is irrelevant how we get our clients.  There is a legendary life insurance speach by the title of, "The Common Demoninator of Success".  Read it and then decide whether you want pleasurable methods or pleasurable results.
 
 

kujhawks300's picture
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Only someone who has never done it, scared to do it or is no good at it would say door knocking is unprofessional.  I held out for one year thinking the same thing...but it's the best, most productive form .  However, you've got to have some skills.  Sooner or later you've got to get in front of them why not make that the first contact.

By the way I now carry a beach umbrella..with flowers on it.  It's ten degrees cooler.  Some people look at me wierd but who wants them as clients anyway.

apprentice's picture
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5 reasons why knocking on doors is unprofessional:
 
1 - it's obvious that you're only interested in selling something
2 - you're categorized with high school magizine sales people, girl scouts, and mormans
3 - if a homeowner doesn't open their door - they will fear being 'tricked' for no treat
4 - other neighbors watch you through their curtains and pray that they're not next
5 - 'real' financial professionals are serious about their work
 
However, keep knocking on them doors - it can only make me look better.
 

apprentice's picture
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Icecold (also a good name for brewery research) - I don't disagree that it takes a lot of dedication and hard work to knock on doors.  However, that hard work and dedication can (should) be focused on activities to target very specific niches.  Also - I throw acedemics out the door - PhD's tell me nothing except that they're professional students with no ability to interact with society.  They live in a world of theory and not application.
 
Door knocking on businesses? YES!  Residential? - absolutely a waste of time.
 

Spaceman Spiff's picture
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apprentice wrote:5 reasons why knocking on doors is unprofessional:
 
1 - it's obvious that you're only interested in selling something -  Says who?  When I go doorknocking I carry nothing but my water bottle and a black binder to keep my stuff in.  I wear a suit or a nice polo shirt with nice dress pants.  Oh yeah, guess what.  I AM only interested in selling them something.  That's how I make my living.  But maybe you make your money differently than I do mine. 
2 - you're categorized with high school magizine sales people, girl scouts, and mormans - I've knocked on literally thousands of doors.  I've had 1 guy say he thought I was a preacher.  I didn't take offense and he was a little relieved that I wasn't trying to save his soul.  We had a great conversation about how he had just left his job and we ended up rolling over his 401K. 
3 - if a homeowner doesn't open their door - they will fear being 'tricked' for no treat - people who wear suits don't play the trick or treat game.  If they don't open their door, I don't talk with them.
4 - other neighbors watch you through their curtains and pray that they're not next - it's like caller ID.  You can either pick it up or let it ring.  The guy on the other end doesn't know or care if you are home or not.
5 - 'real' financial professionals are serious about their work -  I am too.  Would I be a more serious professional if I called them on the phone for the first contact?  Maybe I'd be a more serious professional if I mailed them a postcard inviting them to a free dinner.  Or maybe I'd be a more serious professional if I sat on my happy butt and just waited for people to walk in my office because it says "Spaceman Spiff's Financial Planning" on my door. 
 
However, keep knocking on them doors - it can only make me look better.
 

First, if you've never done it yourself, shut up, because you don't really know what you are talking about. 
 
Doorknocking is about creating a pipeline.  It's free and relatively easy.  It costs me nothing but time and water.  It doesn't mean that I'm not going to ask for referrals or do seminars or any of the other marketing activities that you as a more professional advisor would do. 
 
Here's the way I look at it.  In my target market there are 18,000 households with TLIA of almost $8 billion.  That's just short of $450K per household on average.  So, every doorbell I ring has the possibility of being a new $450K account.  
 
On this forum I've heard people say cold calling is going away.  I've heard that seminars are expensive and don't usually amount to much.  I've heard that postcards get about a 1% response rate.  None of those things sound very successful to me. 
 
Doorknocking works.   

apprentice's picture
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Spaceman - you said that door knocking costs you nothing but time and water.  Isn't time our most valuable asset?
 
Thank you for proving my point!!
 

babbling looney's picture
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snaggletooth wrote:babbling looney wrote:Ha! I had just the opposite door knocking experience in my beginning days.  January. In the snow. Temperature about 32 to 36.   I did get lots of people inviting me inside for hot coffee and cocoa though   I'm sure they thought I was insane.
 
How much do you think them inviting you in was as a result of you being of the female persuasion?  As a guy, I wouldn't think I would have the same success of being invited in...not even close.
 
Probably so.   Being a woman is much less threatening and many of the homes I was door knocking on were retired folks.  In the summer I did door knock as well.  I dealt with the heat pretty much the same way as the guys......except in heels, nylons and casual business suits.   Many people thought I was the Avon lady  so I got a pretty nice reception for that as well.  During the heat of the day, I would visit businesses.
 
To the doubters.  Door knocking works and it isn't demeaning and isn't unprofessional unless you make it so. 
 
For the non-Jones people, you need to know that most of the door knocking is done in the pre-process of establishing your office and that most of the time the Jones rep isn't even able to offer products yet (no can sell date) and is just gathering names and information for a future prospecting list.   I never ever tried to sell a product on the doorstep and mainly used the process as a way to introduce my business and often would drop off a schedule of upcoming FREE seminars.  Retired people have lots of time and like FREE stuff.
 
Jones may get lots of deserved criticism, but there were many things that they did that had value.  Teaching how to prospect is one of them

babbling looney's picture
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apprentice wrote:Spaceman - you said that door knocking costs you nothing but time and water.  Isn't time our most valuable asset?
 
Thank you for proving my point!!
 
 
Getting out from behind your desk and putting your face in front of people is not a waste of time.   You get a much better reception being face to face with prospects than being an anonymous voice on the phone.

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Babbs - I never said anything about being an anonymous voice on the phone (that's almost more unproductive that knocking on doors).  You're correct that face to face is good (in fact - it closes 80% of prospects).
 
Thanks for proving my point - AND - be careful to not put words in the mouths of your clients.  Having good listening skills are important to being successful in this business.
 

babbling looney's picture
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apprentice wrote:Babbs - I never said anything about being an anonymous voice on the phone (that's almost more unproductive that knocking on doors).  You're correct that face to face is good (in fact - it closes 80% of prospects).
 
Thanks for proving my point - AND - be careful to not put words in the mouths of your clients.  Having good listening skills are important to being successful in this business.
 
 
So is having a pleasant personality and not being a supercilious prick.  You might try it.

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I spent my morning doorknocking.  It's 75 and sunny in the midwest today and much more pleasant for me to be outdoors than in.  
 
I had actual conversations with 18 people in about 2 hours.  5 of them want me to call them back.  Some of them I know have other advisors they work with, but I know they are the type of people I'm looking for. One guy invited me in, offered me breakfast, and told me all about his portfolio at AT&T ($300K) and how he's unhappy with his options. 
 
All told it was a good morning.  I did have one lady who said she wouldn't open the door to strangers, but talked to me through the glass.  Come to find out she is already with Jones, so I didn't lose out on anything. 
 
So, apprentice, tell me what I did this morning that was unprofessional?  How would  you have gone about getting those 18 people to talk with you in 2 hours to tell you no thanks, or yes please contact me again?  If you're going to bash the doorknocking, give me something that works better.  I'm always open to new ideas.   

bspears's picture
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Read this on WSJ online edition....thought it fit..
 

Golf Is So Last Year: New Ways to Schmooze Clients
Posted by Simona Covel

Many entrepreneurs consider themselves visionaries or inventors — not salespeople. But without sales, you don’t make money.
No question that the whole concept of “closing sales” is much more nuanced than it used to be. It’s no longer about a guy in a blue suit toting a briefcase door-to-door. Today’s environment is much more complex — with technology tools, social networking and old-fashioned schmoozing all playing a part. And, wariness of salespeople seems higher than ever.

Incredible Hulk's picture
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apprentice wrote: Door knocking on businesses? YES!  Residential? - absolutely a waste of time.
 

How about posting to an anonymous website to a bunch of other brokers? Is that a more productive use of time?

Magician's picture
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I think it depends on what you're looking for, what market you're in, etc.

Also, Spiff, those market share reports are worthless. The methods the home office uses are suspect. Investable assets include 401k assets. In my area, there is 5.5bil in investable assets. I know four firms that will comprise 20% of that. And they aren't laying people off.

Doorknocking works, don't knock it. But what does it work for? I gotta say, people in this area, will NOT do business with door-to-door brokers. It's primarily an engineering and scientist market and the "aww shucks, buy this mutual fund" approach won't work. You need statistics. You need to show stock intersection, you need a value-added proposition. This area has more Ph. D's per capita than any place in the United States. Smith Barney is one street over from my office, Merrill Lynch is three. I have seven Edward Jones offices on my street, three are within less than a mile. Plus, there's some place called "the Mutual Fund Store" which I actually thought was an Edward Jones office.

It works. I won't knock it, but I found another way. And I work a LOT less than others. And I didn't have to "build it wide".

Oh, and as for being unprofessional - what other profession goes door to door for business? Just curious, but I've never had a lawyer, doctor, accountant, chiropractor (yes, i separated them for doctors) knock on my door. I have, however, had several Jones guys come to my door. One of them is still here.

Maybe somebody can take my office when I leave.

I know a lot of people who built it door-knocking - but I know more who built it saying that they door-knocked, but didn't.

hawse771's picture
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LMAO at some of you who think you're sooo much better for cold-calling people during their day off/lunch/dinner to bug them vs knocking on their door? You are dense in the head if you think cold calling is ANY more professional than knocking on a door to introduce yourself and then warm call.
 
If Jones people are vac salesman and mormons then the rest of you who started out cold calling are the equivalent to the "You've won a free prize" or "call to claim your free vacation" like the dorks at Silver Leaf vacation store. Or Shanequa that calls from random telemarketing service survey companies  So seriously..step back and look at the crap that spews from some of your keyboards and realize EVERYONE started somewhere and calling/knocking/random mailing...its all no different and none of it is "unprofessional" so get the heck off your high horse just because you've made it somewhere and feel like talking down to a newb will make you seem more successful
 
Reminds me of some roided out prick at a gym laughing at some new guy just starting to work out failing to realize he started the same way at one time...
 
/rant

hawse771's picture
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O..and DO NOT compare being a FA to a Dr/Lawyer..not even in the same league..we maybe all wish but not so. Being a FA is a salesman..Dr/Lawyer/Accountants are professionals..just my oppinion. Haven't heard of too many people going to school 8 years to be a FA at MS/SB/ML/EDJ...im sure there are some but they wasted their time and it was un-needed

bspears's picture
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OBGYN stopped by the other night soliciting...but didn't let him in....we were eating dinner.

snaggletooth's picture
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hawse771 wrote:O..and DO NOT compare being a FA to a Dr/Lawyer..not even in the same league..we maybe all wish but not so. Being a FA is a salesman..Dr/Lawyer/Accountants are professionals..just my oppinion. Haven't heard of too many people going to school 8 years to be a FA at MS/SB/ML/EDJ...im sure there are some but they wasted their time and it was un-needed
 
I figure I went to school for 8 extra years to be an FA.  I did the 2nd grade twice and the 6th grade three times.  I also had two senior proms in high school...I was a senior at both.  Let's not forget that college was the best 6 years of my life.

Magician's picture
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Wow. Why the hate?

I hope you aren't talking about me. I've been pretty fair I think. And I work at Jones.

I just don't think it's the only way. Other than door-knocking, I've never cold called. But door-knocking never worked for me.

You make a good point about the telemarketing companies though. I wonder how the cold calling people will react....

Magician's picture
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You're right about Doctors/Law/Acct not being FA's, but they still have to get business. Where do they get it? Not door-knocking.

What about EA's (Enrolled Agents)? They know more about taxes than most CPA's, but they went to school for a year maybe? And accountants, oh yeah that Bachelor's in accounting was real hard.

And before any of you CPA's get upset, I did say MOST. I'm sure everybody on THIS board knows everything.

If I go to school for eight years, does that mean I don't have to prospect?

Fine, I'll do another year.

Maxstud's picture
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The difference between cpa/doctors/dentist and lawyers vs fa's is that many times there is a deadline or a pressing need for people to act.  File your taxes by April 15, someone is suing you so you need a lawyer.  Your tooth hurts so you go to the dentist or you were raised properly and the 6 month checkup is what you do besause thats what you do.
 
Lawyers, doctors and CPAs usually intern or clerk with a firm and many times will be hired at a SALARY to do grunt work when they start then  either move up or move on.
Many people think they needs us but they're busy today so they will get to it next week and then oops a year went by.  We must create action to drive business there isn't an April 15 deadline to make sure you can retire and your ankle doesn't hurt when you fall behind your goal.
 
If you don't like being a salesperson then sale a lot and get successful so you don't have to sell anymore.  I hear people just start handing you their money after a while.
 
 

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BTW I have been a salesman all my working life and I love it.  Everytime a help someone I make money and the better I am the more I make.

Magician's picture
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You should ALWAYS be salesman if you are in business. No matter what business. Relationships are about sales. I fought it, and suffered. But when I embraced it, I started knocking it out of the park. It's not the sales that I'm talking about. It's about prospecting methods.

How do scientists who have an idea for a drug solicit money for a startup? I could go on and on about what professions don't doorknock. He likely went to school for eight years, so I guess he doesn't need it. What about writers? Do authors go door to door selling their books? Who "needs" the book or article? Is there timing on that?

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Magician wrote:What about writers? Do authors go door to door selling their books? Who "needs" the book or article? Is there timing on that?
 
Yes they do but they primarily call on business, the business they call on are called Publishers.  When the publisher buys the book it's because they can sell it.  They need the book so they can stay in business by selling books and they pay someone a SALARY to look for books to buy, this person has a deadline because if they don't get the job done they will no longer be offered a SALARY and will not have a job.  So they have a time frame in which to continue to do their job.
 
Your really a pretty stupid person if you couldn't figure that one out.

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Well, there's such a thing as self publishing. I know quite a few people who use that method. And do pretty well. My wife does it with children's books.

Wow, why do you have to be so insulting? I never said it was pretty stupid that people go doorknocking, did I? I said that it works, I was commenting on the perceived professionalism of it.

My definition of professionalism may be different than yours, and I'm sure it is. But also, people in my market do not see it as professional. People in rural areas do.

All I'm saying is that it is very few businesses that go door -to door. Am I correct? Or not?

I also noticed you didn't answer about scientists. I will come up with a list if you want of all "professions" that don't go door to door.

And I'm sorry you are having a bad day.

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Magician wrote:Wow. Why the hate? I hope you aren't talking about me. I've been pretty fair I think. And I work at Jones. I just don't think it's the only way. Other than door-knocking, I've never cold called. But door-knocking never worked for me. You make a good point about the telemarketing companies though. I wonder how the cold calling people will react....
 
The 'hate' wasnt direct at you AT ALL and isnt even 100% because of this thread, though there is some of the same anti-jones bullcrap in here that i see everywhere on here and im tired of the hypocricy in a matter of speaking. It's just BS the things people say on here sometimes and they really need to take a step back and try looking in the mirror and assessing their own lives and how they got there before talking down to others is all.
 
It probably boils down to insecurities and the need to talk down to others to promote themselves..weakness in character. But some of the criticism is idiotic at best.
 
*disclaimer* there ARE justifiable rants towards EDJ that I have read but all this anti-door knocking and pretending its not viable/professional compared to cold calling is reallyyy old...
 

Magician's picture
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hawse - sorry I mischaracterized your post.

I agree that there is a lot of Jones-hate on here.

I can't imagine cold calling either though. Or door-knocking. Whatever works for people.

I will say I do question the professionalism of either method. That doesn't mean it's unprofessional, just trying to have a discussion about it. And I don't think I ever actually said it was unprofessional. Just talking about the perception of it.

And I know you're not talking about me, so thanks. Some people get really touchy on these boards though.

babbling looney's picture
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"My definition of professionalism may be different than yours, and I'm sure it is. But also, people in my market do not see it as professional. People in rural areas do. "
 
There is a big difference in approaching the "door knocking" in rural areas and small towns than in urban areas.  When I was at Jones, we would exchange horror stories about door knocking and the urban stories beat us hands down for pure awfulness. 
 
Again..... I never approached the idea as a sales call but more of an introductory howdy call.  No product information. No asking the stupid "What is your favorite investment" question. No probing questions.  Just hello, here is where my office is and this is a list of the things that I can do for you.   If they wanted to discuss investments, I would briefly oblige but insist that we set an appointment before getting into any real depth.  If they didn't want to make an appointment, then I didn't want to give them any "free" advice on the doorstep.  THAT would be unprofessional.
 
I only go to visit businesses now.  Most of my new business comes from client referrals.All I'm saying is that it is very few businesses that go door -to door. Am I correct? Or not?
 
Maybe.  Again the difference between rural and urban .  When my husband started his business over 20 years ago (plumbing and electric) he went to everyone's house and either met with them and handed a brochure on his business or left the brochure in the door.   Now he has to beat clients away or make them wait before he can get to them.  The new auto glass shop in town did the same thing just a few weeks ago.  I wasn't appalled at their lack of professionalism.  I thought it was a good way to get the word out and admired their initiative.   Personally, I would rather that approach than a phone call at night.

Magician's picture
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Babs - I like your approach. And I'm glad you found a way to make it work. Doesn't quite fit the Jones model though of 5-7 contacts, offering investments and "if you have some money available...".

And yes - I am in an extremely urban area. In the city alone, there are 34 Jones offices.

And I'm not opposed to people coming to my door. I merely asked the question. And wondering what people think about it.

Thank you for the polite dialogue.

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All you 'investment social workers' are confusing 'reception' with 'productivity'.  Of course - if you knock on enough doors - people will welcome you in (again - stay away from the bathtub). 
 
BUT - this string has turned into a digression of arguable theories.  Keep on knockin'
 

anonymous's picture
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Joined: 2005-09-29

I've never done any residential door knocking.  I have done lots of business door knocking. 
 
I would argue that the act of door knocking is neither professional nor unprofessional.   We've all been recipients of door knockers.  My experience has been that some of them have done it in a very professional manner and some have not. 
 
We can argue that one prospecting method is better than another, but that doesn't make one unprofessional. 
 
If I have a meeting with Joe at Joe's Body shop and I get there 10 minutes early, it seems like a pretty dumb business decision to not walk in and introduce myself to the CPA across the street and the owner of the liquor store on the corner.

Spaceman Spiff's picture
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Joined: 2006-08-08

apprentice wrote:All you 'investment social workers' are confusing 'reception' with 'productivity'.  Of course - if you knock on enough doors - people will welcome you in (again - stay away from the bathtub). 
 
BUT - this string has turned into a digression of arguable theories.  Keep on knockin'
 
 
Then let's dispense with the theories.  I've read two comments in this thread that said they found something other than activities like cold calling or doorknocking that really works well for them.  I'd like to hear what those things are and how they work.  Any of you guys that don't doorknock care to share how you bring new clients in the doors?  If I could find something that filled my pipeline faster than doorknocking, I'd never ring another doorbell.  So put up or shut up. 

babbling looney's picture
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Joined: 2004-12-02

apprentice wrote:All you 'investment social workers' are confusing 'reception' with 'productivity'.  Of course - if you knock on enough doors - people will welcome you in (again - stay away from the bathtub). 
 
BUT - this string has turned into a digression of arguable theories.  Keep on knockin'
 
 
No... I think I can recognize productivity when a prospect that I door knocked on turns into a mid 6 figure client.   I'm also pretty sure that I can recognize the difference between the reception of someone just being nice and a qualified prospect worth my time, after 20 years in this business.
 
As we all know it takes persistence to turn prospects into clients.  Does the prospect on the other side of the door or at the local auto shop immediately jump through the hoops and become a client.? Of course not.  It takes multiple contacts after the initial one.
 
When you ,"apprentice", hold a seminar do you have a 100% close rate or do you consider it a non productive event if only 1 in 10 become clients?  If you cold call a person on the phone and he/she hangs up on you or fluffs you off, do you consider that unproductive waste of time? 
 
Is door knocking the best way to find prospects?  Maybe......maybe not.  Depends on your demographics and your personality.  There are lots of ways to prospect and door knocking or personal unannounced visits are one way.   As I said.  I don't need to "door knock" any more because my clients prospect for me with referrals and recommendations to their friends.  I do seminars, educational events and do visit with businesses. 
 
Pray tell, Apprentice.  Enlighten us all on how you turn find prospects and how you turn them into clients.   What is your recommendation for the new investment advisor who has no book of business and not many contacts in the community to get in front of as many people as possible?

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