Rude Awakening at Edward Jones

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Still@jones's picture
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I'm a new FA who just recently finished KYC and I'm struggling with the
whole idea of getting phone numbers. The main reason I am having this
problem is that I just do not like the idea of pitching over the phone.
The face-to-face strategy was the #1 reason I chose to work for Jones
(I had 3 other offers) and I am very disappointed to have these new
expectations. I believe, if I bust my a$$, I could knock on
every door in my town at least once every month and I feel I have the
drive and motivation to do this. For people with whom I have a genuine
conversation (not some bull-s**t conversation about their lawn gnomes)
I would call and try to set up an appointment and have the opportunity
to make my sale. The rest, I would follow up in person and possibly
have a better conversation now that they know me. This is what
I call relationship sales and this is what I signed on to do. I'm very
disappointed about the eval/grad requirements and have been seriously
questioning my decision to join Jones. If there is anyone who can offer some feedback or advice, it would be greatly appreciated.

troll's picture
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Bigmoneyhoney's picture
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Alot of what I do is based solely around relationship sales, which is why I enjoy the company I'm a part of.  I make very few phone calls, and a lot of what I do with setting up appointments is done in person.  You can read my story on another thread called "Newcomer here".  If you want more information about my company and I please PM me and I'll give you details and maybe you would be a better fit in my upline, rather than taking it from "the man" in corporate america.  Look forward to hearing from you.

3rdyrp2's picture
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Man, as a newbie you won't have time to sit around and wait on "relationship sales" to produce biz.  It'll take 9-12 months for relationship-based leads to come through.  Too much rapport and lunch buying in the meantime before any paperwork is signed.  Ask anyone on here how long it took them from the time they joined alliances with a CPA or an estate attorney to getting actual referrals from them, or how long it took them from when they developed their first connection with the Chamber of Commerce for that person to actually come on as a client.  Takes WAYYY too long for that to be your sole source of marketing, especially as a newbie.

troll's picture
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Coolaid's picture
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Hey still@jones, I agree with Wind.  Just do the work and hang in there. I haven't been on here for a long time because I haven't had the time.  Wanted to pop on and reply because I get what you are feeling right now.   I'm out working towards eval/grad and everytime I get worked up about something I realise I'm just making excuses to not do the work. Don't look for a reason to fail.  Door knock your ass off then and get your numbers and appointments to a point where it won't matter that you hate making phone calls.  If you let that psyche you out (especially when it's so far away from what you are supposed to do right now) you will fail. 

Sam Houston's picture
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Don't forget that you can make appointments before eval/grad too.  In person.  Face 2 face.  Just date them for past your grad date.
 
 
....and if they should ever find out you talked to them before you were licensed, you not only get to write a check for them, you also get to contribute to Finra's penalty fund and you are out the business.  Great advice from a veteran to a newbie.

troll's picture
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Bigmoneyhoney wrote:Alot of what I do is based solely around relationship sales, which is why I enjoy the company I'm a part of.  I make very few phone calls, and a lot of what I do with setting up appointments is done in person.  You can read my story on another thread called "Newcomer here".  If you want more information about my company and I please PM me and I'll give you details and maybe you would be a better fit in my upline, rather than taking it from "the man" in corporate america.  Look forward to hearing from you.

 
"Upline"?  Sounds like you're either with Primerica or World Financial Group.
 
This is not a board for recruiting to MLMs.
 
Edward Jones is a MUCH better alternative and better reputation over those two companies (and that's not saying much either).

troll's picture
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Coolaid's picture
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Sam, stop being an ass.  You are not doing anything wrong.  You are not asking for money.  You are not giving advice you are setting up a time to meet with them.  Totally within the boundries of compliance.  Stop looking for fights.

Sam Houston's picture
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Coolaid wrote:Sam, stop being an ass.  You are not doing anything wrong.  You are not asking for money.  You are not giving advice you are setting up a time to meet with them.  Totally within the boundries of compliance.  Stop looking for fights.
 
 
Were you trying to say that you can schedule appts for after your grad date? 

Coolaid's picture
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I'm not engaging in an argument,  I have too much work to do. 

Sam Houston's picture
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Coolaid wrote:I'm not engaging in an argument,  I have too much work to do. 
 
I was thinking maybe I read your post wrong.  Must not have. 

Coolaid's picture
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You probably did Sam.  

troll's picture
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Bigmoneyhoney's picture
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wind3574 wrote:Sam - I'm not as much worried about Cool Aid's comment on appointments as I am the Primerica guy saying move there to not deal with "Taking it from the man". lol Paying for your license - $300 New suit - $400 Working for Primerica, giving your RVP 85% pay-out of your prospects, while being butt-holed from every direction and loving every minute of it - Absolutely Priceless
 
I don't know what you're talking about, but I'm on pace to be making well into the six-figure income within the next 2-3 years.  All while not having to worry about being "butt-holed" by my boss, or having to worry about abiding by some strict schedule.  I'm 100% independent, and the activity I am doing right now is more than many of my cohorts. 

Coolaid's picture
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Don't set appointments.  I would like to clarify that it is NOT ok to to give any solicitation of business before eval/grad.  Wrong wording.  My apologies.And no my name doesn't start with C.

troll's picture
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Bigmoneyhoney wrote:wind3574 wrote:Sam - I'm not as much worried about Cool Aid's comment on appointments as I am the Primerica guy saying move there to not deal with "Taking it from the man". lol Paying for your license - $300 New suit - $400 Working for Primerica, giving your RVP 85% pay-out of your prospects, while being butt-holed from every direction and loving every minute of it - Absolutely Priceless
 
I don't know what you're talking about, but I'm on pace to be making well into the six-figure income within the next 2-3 years.  All while not having to worry about being "butt-holed" by my boss, or having to worry about abiding by some strict schedule.  I'm 100% independent, and the activity I am doing right now is more than many of my cohorts. 

 
Your ignorance of your situation is astounding.

3rdyrp2's picture
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wind3574 wrote:3rdyrp2 - You have to remember. At Jones you do nothing but prospect for 3 months. Anyone who can't start developing some business relationships within that time probably shouldn't be in this biz. Building relationships first and then selling to my clients is workin fine for me, but then again not everyone does things the same way, especially in different parts of the country....
 
I know it's very important to develop those relationships early on, but to expect you can rely solely on relationship-based sales when you first start out and still have a job in 6 months is more than someone can handle.  I could be wrong, but I don't think you can live off of COI's and business alliances and not do quick turn-around marketing strategies, cold calling or door knocking in your 1st year, unless you are a former CPA or estate attorney transitioning your current clients/contacts with you

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3rdyrp2 wrote: wind3574 wrote:3rdyrp2 - You have to remember. At Jones you do nothing but prospect for 3 months. Anyone who can't start developing some business relationships within that time probably shouldn't be in this biz. Building relationships first and then selling to my clients is workin fine for me, but then again not everyone does things the same way, especially in different parts of the country....
 
I know it's very important to develop those relationships early on, but to expect you can rely solely on relationship-based sales when you first start out and still have a job in 6 months is more than someone can handle.  I could be wrong, but I don't think you can live off of COI's and business alliances and not do quick turn-around marketing strategies, cold calling or door knocking in your 1st year, unless you are a former CPA or estate attorney transitioning your current clients/contacts with you

I think you all are misunderstanding the OP. He is not talking about networking, he is talking about building a relationship with the client through face-to-face interaction versus product pushing over the phone. He said he came to Jones for that Face-to-Face approach, and from what I can gather, he is under the impression he will have to sell over the phone. (Please correct me if I'm wrong, still@Jones.)

Now, I am curious, if I could get some feedback from other EDJ newbies, is this pitching over the phone @ Eval/Grad actually an expectation? I don't see how that fits into the business model. I just started SFS and I don't know how many times I have read that a recommendation must meet a client's individual needs. How is it possible to make a recommendation over the phone at Eval/Grad? There is no way the client's needs have been established at that point. I thought the big thing at Eval/Grad was setting appointments.

Indyone's picture
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Ominous wrote:Bigmoneyhoney wrote:wind3574 wrote:Sam - I'm not as much worried about Cool Aid's comment on appointments as I am the Primerica guy saying move there to not deal with "Taking it from the man". lol Paying for your license - $300 New suit - $400 Working for Primerica, giving your RVP 85% pay-out of your prospects, while being butt-holed from every direction and loving every minute of it - Absolutely Priceless
 
I don't know what you're talking about, but I'm on pace to be making well into the six-figure income within the next 2-3 years.  All while not having to worry about being "butt-holed" by my boss, or having to worry about abiding by some strict schedule.  I'm 100% independent, and the activity I am doing right now is more than many of my cohorts. 

 
Your ignorance of your situation is astounding.
 
The only thing this idiot is on pace for is arbitration.

troll's picture
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Dianna912's picture
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wind3574 wrote:

Diane - Yes you have to make 60 product presentations at eval grad and have 20 pipelines (money dues/referrals, etc).. It really isn't that bad, but I can promise you I went for the appointment. It also depends on your ATL because mine was REALLY relaxed and so was my VV. But I have heard of some that were military style so. It's really just a game, they want to make sure you can do the job. It's not really about what you can make at Eval/Grad. I only sold one bond, but I've done extremely well since I've been back. Just play the game.

Thanks Windy! Are you basically just presenting bonds, or what? I just don't see how you can get to the point of recommending a product after just a door knock, especially a door knock that was done before you can even talk investments.

My actual start date is tomorrow, but I went ahead and started studying this past week to get a head start for when the hard stuff hits.

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Thanks for everyone who provided positive information and "get a life" for everyone else who is filling this forum with moronic banter...and of course, the Ameriprise guy shouldn't even be on this forum, unless he's hoping to join Jones one day (which he probably is...).I seem to be getting the mantra, "just stick it out and things will be better after eval/grad" from almost everyone I speak to; but, it still is disheartening to be given this assignment. This clearly goes against everything I was led to believe during the interview process. Also, there are a few people who have told me off-line that the phone calls need to continue for the first 2 years...this is getting depressing.

3rdyrp2's picture
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Whats wrong w/the Ameriprise guy??  I was giving some advice that I thought was pretty sound.  I mid-read the question, and thought you wanted to build your business starting off of COI's and business alliances.  Thats what I thought by "relationship sales."  I agree w/Wind when he says he wants to actually meet the prospect and develop rapport before recommending products, which is correct.  I just never called that "relationship sales", I considered it developing a client relationship. 

troll's picture
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Ameriprise is fine for this forum.  I have a problem with the MLM'ers.
 
"Ameriprise"  "Primerica" - their names are not the greatest for an ad campaign at any rate.

Borker Boy's picture
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The sales-related phone calls will never end. Getting people to buy stuff is the sole purpose of our existence.
 
Jones loves to harp on the "suitability" issue, but Ted Jones himself used to say "Sell them something they want and then sell them something they need."
 
I agree, it's very confusing. 
 
And I've been at Jones for 3+ years. 

voltmoie's picture
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If you didn't know this was a sales job you are in for a rude awakening.  You pitch the product to build the relationship, it's not about selling 20k worth of bonds on that call it's about moving the relationship, learning more, etc.  They are not  boiler room calls but you're not going to sale a damn thing if you don't ask.

troll's picture
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voltmoie's picture
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Windy... we know you are a god and all but most people never make a sale because they don't ask for it.  That's sales 101 - no use disputing it. The pitch gets the conversation started.  It allows you to qualify the person.  CAN THEY DO BUSINESS WITH ME, WILL THEY DO BUSINESS WITH ME?  You could be the exception to the rule but after you blow through the low hanging fruit from your 3 months of door knocking I expect the real side of the business will take hold. Of course, you could be Zeus reborn and have the world bow at your feet but your experience will be anything but the norm.

troll's picture
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troll's picture
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Sometimes you can break all the rules and still "win".

Dianna912's picture
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I get what Wind is saying. I've always had much better luck selling in person. My focus has always been getting the appointment when calling, not actually pushing a product over the phone. Should be an interesting change.

voltmoie's picture
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Windy - you have a major complex man, I'm not doubting your production or methods.  This is not about you it's about someone that has a problem asking for a sale. Low hanging fruit you had for sure, just like I do.  You walk into a business and the owner wants to do business with you after 20 mins.. That's not relationship building that's just lucky.  We've all been there but it's not the typical sale.Dianna - pushing the product is not the goal it's the bridge to an appointment.  Do you really think people in your community want random Jones brokers to call you talk about fishing?  They know what you do - they want to know what the hell is going on with the market and how you can help them.

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Hank Newbie's picture
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LOL..."John/Jane, This is an excellent opportunity and if you have the money available, I think you should buy some today!".  That is, in a nut shell, the heart of what you should get to, eventually.  Even if you don't make a sale, it advances the conversation into game on mode.  If you don't create an expectation at the door that you will be calling clients back with an appropriate recommendation, be it a muni, blue chip, etc, you will set yourself up for major disappointment later on down the road.

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Still@jones wrote:Thanks for everyone who provided positive information and "get a life" for everyone else who is filling this forum with moronic banter...and of course, the Ameriprise guy shouldn't even be on this forum, unless he's hoping to join Jones one day (which he probably is...).I seem to be getting the mantra, "just stick it out and things will be better after eval/grad" from almost everyone I speak to; but, it still is disheartening to be given this assignment. This clearly goes against everything I was led to believe during the interview process. Also, there are a few people who have told me off-line that the phone calls need to continue for the first 2 years...this is getting depressing.
 
Let's just put some perspective to this....
 
Despite how it appears, Jones is not really about "product pushing over the phone".  The sole purpose of these phone sessions - and some veterans AND trainers will admit this - is to train you to sell and be comfortable selling.  They pretty much KNOW you will not sell anything at Eval/Grad (even though they have the silly contest).  They are just forcing you to do something that is not natural and not comfortable.  And the reality is, you can't spend the rest of your career going face-to-face.  You have to rely on the phone at some point.  You are going to call to make appointments, catch up with people, build relationships, fill a "gap" in their portfolio, whatever.  But the reality is, if you someday have 250-500 clients, are you still going to be driving around town dropping off literature to them?  You're not.  And don't forget, every phone call is not a "sales call".  You don't have to sell product over the phone.
 
They are going to make you say some pretty silly stuff on the phone in STL.  Just hang in there.  It's all about training.  They can't train 50 different newbies 50 different ways.  Just get through it, call your worst prospects (so not to embarass yourself in front of good prospects), and make a conscious effort to get good on the phone. 
 
You are still going to meet with people face-to-face the rest of your career, but like I said, the phone is going to be your friend.  You have to get used to it.  Whether you work here or anywhere else, you need to use the phone.
 
As far as using the phone "for the next 2 years", I don't quite get that.  You realistically are using the phone the rest of your career.  What you use it for is up to you.

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I think it's a little funny that already, before you new guys have your CSD, you're already trying to change the recipe.  Before you decide "relationship sales" or FTF sales, or whatever you want to call it is THE way you're going to get things done,  you might want to talk with your regional leader or the vets in your area.  They may have some other suggestions for you.  None of you have ever sold stocks or bonds before.  I find it funny that you're making up your own rules before you even start the game. 
 
You're going to have calling sessions every day at Eval/Grad.  Used to be no more than an hour or so.  During that time you're going to call on specific things.  One time it will be a bond, one time a stock, others you get to pick.  You will have spent your time between KYC and E/G out meeting people, telling them that when you find something you think could be of value to them, you'll let them know.  That's what you're doing.  You're delivering on a promise.  You do that several times and you'll find yourself opening a new account.
 
Here's the problem with calling for appointments only:
 
You:  Hello Mr. Smith, this is Spaceman Spiff with EDJ.  Did I catch you at a good time or do you have just a minute?
 
Them:  I'm busy, what do you want.
 
You:  Then I'll be brief.  Mr. Smith, when I was at your door a few weeks ago we talked briefly about your financial situation and I'm calling to see if you would like to sit down with me so we can do a portfolio review.  How does next Tuesday at 10 or Thursday at 5 sound for you?
 
Them:  No.  I'm not interested.  I'm sticking with the guy that I've got. 
 
You:  OK, well, then um....Thanks for your time.  Good bye.
 
You're done with that prospect.  You can keep going back to bug him about setting an appointment with you, but eventually he's just going to tell you to go away.  Him telling you no about an appointment is a different vibe than telling you no on a stock or a bond.  When he tells you no, he doesn't want to buy that stock, you can ask him why.  Or you can tell him when you see something else, you'll call him again.  Maybe he doesn't like stocks.  Maybe he prefers tax free bonds to corporates.  It doesn't completely shut down the process. 
 
 
    
 
 
 

Ron 14's picture
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You're done with that prospect.  You can keep going back to bug him about setting an appointment with you, but eventually he's just going to tell you to go away.  Him telling you no about an appointment is a different vibe than telling you no on a stock or a bond.  When he tells you no, he doesn't want to buy that stock, you can ask him why.  Or you can tell him when you see something else, you'll call him again.  Maybe he doesn't like stocks.  Maybe he prefers tax free bonds to corporates.  It doesn't completely shut down the process. 
 
Exactly. By asking for an appointment right out of the gate the prospect is going to say no because you haven't provided any reason for the appointment. If you tell him "we" have made available a tax free bond at 5% he will still say no but you will get more information from him because there is now something to discuss.
 

SometimesNowhere's picture
Joined: 2008-12-22

As said many times in this thread, and any vet will tell you, the business is about relationship building and reputation. My personal opinion about the Jones training process is that they are trying to give you the means to build a relationship. In that case, it is not about product sales, but selling who you are in contrast with either who they are working with/what they are currently doing. It is a process that was built to be one size fits all, from the no sales experience and up. Calling a client and offering them a product is just a conversation starter for you if you don't know any other way to meaningfully start the conversation.
B24 is right. You don't need to burn your good relationships for some ATL in Eval/Grad pitching them some stock that they think is great. Hit your numbers the way they ask you to, and cultivate your promising relationships for the time where the client is comfortable moving forward and you are ready to provide them the service they deserve.
 
And the Ameriprise dig was a bit unfair. I thought he/she was trying to be helpful.

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So, basically, you tell your prospect that if you come across something that looks particularly good for them, then you'll be sure to let them know about it. And when something comes up that's suitable for their situation (given the superficial information that you probably got from them at the "meet and greet"), then you go back and sell it to them, right? If you close the deal, then you make a little money; however, what you're really going for is a "conduit" to start building a real relationship that will turn this "customer" into a happily involved client that ideally uses several products and services, am I reading you right?

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Thanks, I really appreciate the perspective. It makes a lot more sense now. I will definitely have to break out of the bank mentality.

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Marty McFly wrote:
So, basically, you tell your prospect that if you come across something that looks particularly good for them, then you'll be sure to let them know about it. And when something comes up that's suitable for their situation (given the superficial information that you probably got from them at the "meet and greet"), then you go back and sell it to them, right? If you close the deal, then you make a little money; however, what you're really going for is a "conduit" to start building a real relationship that will turn this "customer" into a happily involved client that ideally uses several products and services, am I reading you right?
 
Exactly.  Your job is to get people to listen to you and do what you know is best for them.  Sometimes you do have to do like Ted Jones said and sell them what they want before you sell them what they need.  That investment they want may be the perfect conduit to allow you to talk with them about what they really ought to be doing with their portfolio. 

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Spaceman Spiff wrote: Exactly.  Your job is to get people to listen to you and do what you know is best for them.  Sometimes you do have to do like Ted Jones said and sell them what they want before you sell them what they need.  That investment they want may be the perfect conduit to allow you to talk with them about what they really ought to be doing with their portfolio. 
 
Interesting way of thinking.  Could you clarify "selling them something they want before something they need?"  Is this like if someone has a fetish for the Far East markets, you'll overweight them in China/Japan/etc. in their international funds to appease them, or is this like if they hear great things about no-load funds, you recommend a portfolio of no-loads, then wait for their next rollover to put them in wrap accounts/annuity/a shares, etc.?  From my experience, I don't get a whole lot of pushback from clients when going over specific investments, unless they are adamant about not investing in tobacco or defense companies.  But I'll fight to the death any clients that insist on buying no-load funds as their initial order of business with me.

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I think you're over-analyzing this.  What they talk about is maybe someone "only buys CD's".  So you sell them their next CD because our rate is a little better than the bank.  Or maybe they love utility stocks.  So you buy them 100 shares of some solid utility.  So now you have the relationship formalized.  Now you can get them in and start talking about their goals.  Maybe they need to be a little more aggressive, or a little less aggressive.  Maybe they are too overwieght.  You understand what I'm saying.  They "easy sale" for something they want (which is usually stuff they already buy somewhere else) just opens the door.  But no, it doesn't mean you give away no-load funds, or sell them a BRIC fund with their last $2,000. 

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No, I sell them pretty much whatever they want.  $100K to invest in emerging markets?  Sure you can buy that.  $250K in treasuries?  Sure you can buy that.  You want some stocks too?  I just got a tip on a pink sheet stock.  Going through the roof.  Before you know it, it'll probably be at $1 per share.  We can buy 100,000 shares today and it'll only cost you $2000.  Think of the money you'll make. 
 
 
 
 
 
Goober. 

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B24 wrote:I think you're over-analyzing this.  What they talk about is maybe someone "only buys CD's".  So you sell them their next CD because our rate is a little better than the bank.  Or maybe they love utility stocks.  So you buy them 100 shares of some solid utility.  So now you have the relationship formalized.  Now you can get them in and start talking about their goals.  Maybe they need to be a little more aggressive, or a little less aggressive.  Maybe they are too overwieght.  You understand what I'm saying.  They "easy sale" for something they want (which is usually stuff they already buy somewhere else) just opens the door.  But no, it doesn't mean you give away no-load funds, or sell them a BRIC fund with their last $2,000. 
 
Well put.  Thanks.

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Spaceman Spiff wrote:No, I sell them pretty much whatever they want.  $100K to invest in emerging markets?  Sure you can buy that.  $250K in treasuries?  Sure you can buy that.  You want some stocks too?  I just got a tip on a pink sheet stock.  Going through the roof.  Before you know it, it'll probably be at $1 per share.  We can buy 100,000 shares today and it'll only cost you $2000.  Think of the money you'll make. 
 
 
 
 
 
Goober. 
 
This is the 2nd time I've been flamed on this thread for no reason.  WTF?

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B24 wrote:
I think you're over-analyzing this.  What they talk about is maybe someone "only buys CD's".  So you sell them their next CD because our rate is a little better than the bank.  Or maybe they love utility stocks.  So you buy them 100 shares of some solid utility.  So now you have the relationship formalized.  Now you can get them in and start talking about their goals.  Maybe they need to be a little more aggressive, or a little less aggressive.  Maybe they are too overwieght.  You understand what I'm saying.  They "easy sale" for something they want (which is usually stuff they already buy somewhere else) just opens the door.  But no, it doesn't mean you give away no-load funds, or sell them a BRIC fund with their last $2,000. 
 
First of all that just seems redundant to me.  Second of all that's very judgemental of you.  Maybe they have a gland problem.  All kidding aside, that was explained very well.  Good on ya B24.

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3rdyrp2 wrote:Spaceman Spiff wrote:No, I sell them pretty much whatever they want.  $100K to invest in emerging markets?  Sure you can buy that.  $250K in treasuries?  Sure you can buy that.  You want some stocks too?  I just got a tip on a pink sheet stock.  Going through the roof.  Before you know it, it'll probably be at $1 per share.  We can buy 100,000 shares today and it'll only cost you $2000.  Think of the money you'll make. 
 
 
 
 
 
Goober. 
 
This is the 2nd time I've been flamed on this thread for no reason.  WTF?
 
I took it as a slam on my comment about selling them what you want. 
 
If it wasn't intended it that way, my apologies for the goober response.  If it was then...
 
 
 
 
Goober.

voltmoie's picture
Offline
Joined: 2008-11-05

Windy .. I always thought the forum community was a bit tough on you.  How
everything you post is all about you.  Now I realize what they already knew, you
are a functional retard.

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