Reading List

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Closer's picture
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Joined: 2007-02-26

As a rookie, I am always eager to learn as much as I can.Experienced advisors, what books would you recommend, either broad-based or based on a specific concept within the industry. I'm looking to make a big Barnes and Noble run. Haha. Thanks...

pretzelhead's picture
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Joined: 2007-03-23

Greatest Salesman in the World
 

Reggin's picture
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Joined: 2005-09-03

"The Wedge" by Randy Schwantz. Go buy it today and read it tonight.

pretzelhead's picture
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Joined: 2007-03-23

Reggin wrote:"The Wedge" by Randy Schwantz. Go buy it today and read it tonight.
Isn't it "How to get your competition fired" ?

deekay's picture
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Joined: 2007-05-15

pretzelhead wrote:
Reggin wrote:"The Wedge" by Randy Schwantz. Go buy it today and read it tonight.
Isn't it "How to get your competition fired" ?

He's got two books on the Wedge.  Same stuff, good stuff.

deekay's picture
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Joined: 2007-05-15

I recommend Nick Murray's "The New Financial Advisor".  However, you can only get it by ordering from his website.

troll's picture
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Joined: 2004-11-29

The Art of Selling Intangibles by LeRoy Gross--who could sell ice to eskimos.

Reggin's picture
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DAtoo wrote:The Art of Selling Intangibles by LeRoy Gross--who could sell ice to eskimos.
Good one, Richard.

doberman's picture
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Joined: 2005-02-22

Reggin wrote:"The Wedge" by Randy Schwantz. Go buy it today and read it tonight.
Ditto that recommendation!

Closer's picture
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Joined: 2007-02-26

Any more? There has got to be more.

snaggletooth's picture
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Joined: 2007-07-13

Closer wrote:Any more? There has got to be more.
I like to have random trivia to throw out to people to spark conversations.  You can find good books on these short stories.  For instance:
Alexander Hamilton was born out of wedlock in the Caribbean.  He was very smart and was able to attend school in Elizabethtown.  He then joined the military where he became great friends with George Washington.  He was Washington's right hand man in the Revolutionary War where soldiers were given bonds as payment to fight in the war.  Well the United States won the war and Washington became president and appointed Hamilton to be the first Secretary of the Treasury of the country.  Most everyone in power said, "Since the bonds were issued before the war and before we were the United States, we don't have to repay those bonds".  So thinking the bonds were worthless, the soldiers sold them to speculators for pennies on the dollar.  Alexander Hamilton then proclaimed that he gauranteed ALL bonds would be paid back in full and they were...Needless to say, the speculators made a ton of money.
Another story:
There were many, many, many paper bonds physically held in the WTC during the attacks.  They were all destroyed in the attack and many companies had debts they technically didn't have to pay back.  However, EVERY SINGLE COMPANY paid back or replaced ALL bonds that were held there.  It makes a strong statement.
Bottom line, good stories can go a long way to selling someone on yourself or services.
"Storytelling for Financial Advisors" speaks of this issue.

deekay's picture
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Joined: 2007-05-15

Closer wrote:Any more? There has got to be more.
We've given you plenty.  Have you even bothered to look on amazon.com or anywhere else?  Or are you so dependant on the help of others to do your research? 
And you wonder why we're skeptical that you'll survive at the wirehouses.....

Mr2Row's picture
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Joined: 2006-01-20

Storyselling for financial advisors is a great one!! This may be the link for it.
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp? z=y&EAN=9780793136643&itm=2

bluestars80's picture
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Joined: 2007-07-12

ANY Nick Murray books........
The Millionaire Next Door, The Millioniare Mind...........
 

BondGuy's picture
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Joined: 2006-09-21

Prospecting Your Way To Sales Success- Bill Good- This book will give the reader an entire career building system.
Liars Poker-Michael Lewis - Entertaining yet because he's a sales trainee some may relate.
Please excuse the terminology, but to make it this business you've got to have balls, metaphorically speaking. One of the best "we've got balls" books- Barbarians at the Gate: The fall of RJR Nabisco. If you ever find yourself with a case of phoneitis, pick up this book and read about investment bankers cold calling to make billion dollar deals.
How to Sell Anything to Anybody-Joe Girard - If you think you can't learn anything from a 30 year old book think again. Girard still holds the title of World's Greatest Salesperson, as well as the Guinness World record. He has sold more big ticket retail items at one time than any other person. For example; 18 cars in one day.
As already mentioned, Nick Murray and LeRoy Gross. Both are must reads for trainees.
 

pretzelhead's picture
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Joined: 2007-03-23

Richest man in Babylon

LEAP's picture
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Joined: 2006-11-15

How I Raised Myself from Failure to Success in Selling
Old Book with many of the time tested ideas for both face to face and phone interviews such as motivation, proper questioning, Creating confidence, overcoming objections before they become confrontational, how to remember names, success with gatekeepers and ultimately - how to get the client to help you make the sale.
 
 

Dust Bunny's picture
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Joined: 2007-05-07

I'm currently reading The Forgotten Man by Amity Shlaes.  A history on the depression, Hoover, Roosevelt and the economic theories struggling to control the economy.  Keynesian vs Free Market.  Taxation as a way to control business and the ramifications on the economy of the US and the world.  Also a lot about the misconceptions and distortions in the way we teach about the history of that period.  Slanting history to suit our current predjudices.
Very interesting!  I see a lot of parallels to the way that Congress is attempting to fine tune and control the economy today.  Scary too.  We seem to be unable to learn from history and may be doomed to repeat it.   (Oil profits tax and excess profits taxes....anyone?)

troll's picture
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Joined: 2004-11-29

Dust Bunny wrote:
I'm currently reading The Forgotten Man by Amity Shlaes.  A history on the depression, Hoover, Roosevelt and the economic theories struggling to control the economy.  Keynesian vs Free Market.  Taxation as a way to control business and the ramifications on the economy of the US and the world.  Also a lot about the misconceptions and distortions in the way we teach about the history of that period.  Slanting history to suit our current predjudices.
Very interesting!  I see a lot of parallels to the way that Congress is attempting to fine tune and control the economy today.  Scary too.  We seem to be unable to learn from history and may be doomed to repeat it.   (Oil profits tax and excess profits taxes....anyone?)

What percentage of those who are reading this do you think have ever even heard of Hoover, much less have an opinion of Keynsian versus Free Market monetary policy?

Dust Bunny's picture
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Joined: 2007-05-07

DAtoo wrote:Dust Bunny wrote:
I'm currently reading The Forgotten Man by Amity Shlaes.  A history on the depression, Hoover, Roosevelt and the economic theories struggling to control the economy.  Keynesian vs Free Market.  Taxation as a way to control business and the ramifications on the economy of the US and the world.  Also a lot about the misconceptions and distortions in the way we teach about the history of that period.  Slanting history to suit our current predjudices.
Very interesting!  I see a lot of parallels to the way that Congress is attempting to fine tune and control the economy today.  Scary too.  We seem to be unable to learn from history and may be doomed to repeat it.   (Oil profits tax and excess profits taxes....anyone?)

What percentage of those who are reading this do you think have ever even heard of Hoover, much less have an opinion of Keynsian versus Free Market monetary policy?

You mean on this forum?  Not too many, which is why they should be reading this.  It is a good and entertaining read on a fairly dry topic.

troll's picture
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Joined: 2004-11-29

Dust Bunny wrote:DAtoo wrote:Dust Bunny wrote:
I'm currently reading The Forgotten Man by Amity Shlaes.  A history on the depression, Hoover, Roosevelt and the economic theories struggling to control the economy.  Keynesian vs Free Market.  Taxation as a way to control business and the ramifications on the economy of the US and the world.  Also a lot about the misconceptions and distortions in the way we teach about the history of that period.  Slanting history to suit our current predjudices.
Very interesting!  I see a lot of parallels to the way that Congress is attempting to fine tune and control the economy today.  Scary too.  We seem to be unable to learn from history and may be doomed to repeat it.   (Oil profits tax and excess profits taxes....anyone?)

What percentage of those who are reading this do you think have ever even heard of Hoover, much less have an opinion of Keynsian versus Free Market monetary policy?

You mean on this forum?  Not too many, which is why they should be reading this.  It is a good and entertaining read on a fairly dry topic.

If they can't write a sentence without making errors do you really think they can read anything other than comic books?

Devils Advocate's picture
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Joined: 2007-08-08

DAtoo wrote:Dust Bunny wrote:DAtoo wrote:Dust Bunny wrote:
I'm currently reading The Forgotten Man by Amity Shlaes.  A history on the depression, Hoover, Roosevelt and the economic theories struggling to control the economy.  Keynesian vs Free Market.  Taxation as a way to control business and the ramifications on the economy of the US and the world.  Also a lot about the misconceptions and distortions in the way we teach about the history of that period.  Slanting history to suit our current predjudices.
Very interesting!  I see a lot of parallels to the way that Congress is attempting to fine tune and control the economy today.  Scary too.  We seem to be unable to learn from history and may be doomed to repeat it.   (Oil profits tax and excess profits taxes....anyone?)

What percentage of those who are reading this do you think have ever even heard of Hoover, much less have an opinion of Keynsian versus Free Market monetary policy?

You mean on this forum?  Not too many, which is why they should be reading this.  It is a good and entertaining read on a fairly dry topic.

If they can't write a sentence without making errors do you really think they can read anything other than comic books?

Stop playing Devils Advocate.

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