First 3 years-$$$

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edjnewhire's picture
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Joined: 2007-12-14

I hear alot about "starving the first 3 years" and make sure you have a good savings.  I am wondering if this is for everyone or in general.  I am in a smaller town and about to start with Jones.  The average for the first year with the small salary they give you and the milestone bonuses are around $50,000-$55,000.  Is this what people mean by "starving"?  For me or for someone just out of school that is alot of money.  The cost of living down south is so much less than the north so if I were to make that the first year I would be content.  Of course I know I have to work hard to attain even that but it's not going to make my family go hungry.
I understand for those in the industry that can make 6 figures $50,000 is peanuts, but for all the posts telling us newbies that we will struggle beyond belief is not completely accurate given each persons individual circumstances.
I guess I wanted to make sure the $50,000 they estimate you can make is also a fabrication.  If it was even less than that then I understand what those posters were getting at.  Thanks!

Brokermike99's picture
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LMFAO if you're just out of school there is no way in hell any branch manager will give you a salary that will get you close to 50k in your first year. More like 25k in training, and a sliding scale salary plus commission structure when you begin production. I'm one of 14 left out of 65 trainees. My first year I made about 25k (most of that time was in training). Next year I made 50, then 70, then 110 and now on to my 5th year with 75mil AUM and about 40bps velocity. But then again I don't do much fee based business. My numbers were the second highest out of 65 people. 51 of those people failed

Roadhard's picture
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Joined: 2007-02-23

I was at Jones for 15 years and you will probaby end your first 12 months with Salary and commissions at 50-55k,  the buildup for the average FA is what Brokermike99 said...That being said--you have a great chance at being still around at 12 months if you work at it.  Being straight out of school and I take it without a spouse to screw things up with help you out a lot at first.  Work hard, build a book over several years---then figure where the next step leads you!  Don't let personal relationships get in the way during your first year and a half--if you get hard up look up Miss Jones on this forum--Fridays are a gooooood day!

apex01's picture
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Joined: 2007-06-27

Live a lifestyle that is consistent with your worst paying months. Bank as much money as you can in your first year. When you go on straight commission it will soften the blow. If your starting new-new than you better plan on starving for the first 5 years. If your single  stay that way. If your married with kids your wife needs to know she will be picking up a lot of the slack for awhile.
50K is starving to a lot of veteran reps, however, keep in mind that there is a big difference between the haves and have nots. This is especially true at Jones. You probably interviewed with a local rep who had a nice office with a couple assitants. He makes a few calls and checks his money due list and by lunch he has made his money.  This will not be your life for a long long time and odds are you'll never make it that far!! Remember in year 2 for you to make $55,000 you will need to do around $150,000 Gross. That is 12,500/mo. In Jones language that means you need to sell $415,000 of American Funds assuming an average of 3% after breakpoints. 
 
My point.....you shouldn't even be worrying about the average first year pay.  You should be developing a plan that will enable you to create your own pay!  Best of Luck!

MISS JONES's picture
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Joined: 2007-08-28

My first year with Jones I made 83,000. That included my salary, bonuses and commissions. I know that the numbers Jones says at 50K is not easy to make.. I knew of several people in my region that washed out because they couldn't pay their bills (they were making in the 30's) They weren't able to hit the milestone bonuses as Jones includes that in the 50,000..
I know that my success was out of the norm but with that said it is possible! Just work hard and never give up! Oh yea- if you can take over an office that will help out!
 
Miss J 

edjnewhire's picture
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Joined: 2007-12-14

Miss Jones that was so helpful.  I appreciate the advice and your honest opinions.  I apologize if i gave anyone the idea I was just out of school and single.  I am a 31 year old woman and I have 2 small babies.  I am engaged and my fiance is working a decent job and currently we both make close to $60,000 a year together.  I could survive if I made in the mid $30,000 but I am not venturing into this business to make the average or what I need to survive.  I want to succeed and build a good life for me and my family. 
 
All I have ever done in my life is sales and and I have always been interested in this industry.  I think it is a good situation that I was asked to goodknight with my financial advisor.  I know I am not going to be given freebies and survive solely on that, but one would think I will have a better start than someone who starts out with nothing.  I have someone who wants to help me and as my financial advisor I can't see him just letting me fail, it wouldn't benefit him any.
 
I expect to work hard, I have heard over and over what it will take.  You just hear such bad things here, and I and switching industries, my best year salary wise was taking home $39,000, so to hear $50,000 if I work hard and attain goals is good for me.  Even more is even better. 
 
Thanks!

cmg235s's picture
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Joined: 2007-10-23

I did a Goodknight also and the best advice I can give you is to not that those assets control your destiny. Basically, I am saying don't sit on your butt calling those peole all day because as someone else said previously, they are not good clients to begin with. I have GK clients that still won't return my calls after 1.5 years. It will help you get some referrals and does help weather the ever proverbial storm.
 
Miss Jones is out of the ordinary, my first year I did $65K but landed a huge 401k and hit 2 of 3 bonuses. Also, I am in a heavily saturated area. 13 Offices are in my suburb of only 40,000 people but there is still opportunity. I like Jones but I have connections to Partners from growing up in St Louis and that is why I chose Jones over the other great firms.
 
You chose a great place to work and begin your career in my opinion. Others on this forum will knock Jones because there are positives and negatives as with any firm. Overall, it is a great place and you do get free turkeys at Thanksgiving.

Spaceman Spiff's picture
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Joined: 2006-08-08

Your first year earnings, let's get away from the salary terminology, will be directly correlated with the effort you put in.  Your Goodknight offer is a nice little headstart, but won't pay the bills or keep you employed long term.  You might find some diamonds among the big chunks of coal in the clients you get, but don't count on it.  Think about it like you are starting from scratch.  That way anything you get from the GKN clients will be gravy. 
 
Those milestone bonuses are sweet.  They weren't around when I started.  My first full year I made $55,000 without any of those bonuses.  Had they been around I would have made $72,000.  I took over an office so that helped a little.  Work hard and you'll be fine. 

cmg235s's picture
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Joined: 2007-10-23

Very true. I guess no other FA on this forum is having much luck this time of year. Some of my best clients are not even calling me back. Prepare for that too. "It's the most wonderful time of the year."

Borker Boy's picture
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I have a buddy whose father is the owner of a huge CPA firm in his town. I can't even tell you the number of "liquid" millionaires he's had sent to him by his father's firm. It's a fantastic setup, but he's definitely not living the life of the average new Jones FA.  
 
I also believe it's folks like him who tend to skew those first-year averages. He's done little to no prospecting thus far, but managed to make $125K his first year. This year will be even higher.
 
On the other hand, I've got another friend who is extremely outgoing, hardworking and has family who work for Jones. He's busted his tail for a couple years now and is about to wash out.
 
The first year isn't what you need to worry about; during that time you'll at least have a minimum amount that you're guaranteed will be in the bank. It's years two through five that are really rough. I know of folks who had a decent first year, and then had several months in their second year where they netted $200.
 
It's tough, and I refuse to tell you that if you work hard enough you'll make it. There are  many other factors involved than just working hard. However, one of the few guarantees in this business is that if you don't work hard (or have an incredible referral base) you will definitely be job hunting after a year or so. 
 
I hate to be discouraging, but I refuse to lie to potential applicants just so I can get credit toward earning a trip.
 
Good luck with your endeavor.

Roadhard's picture
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Joined: 2007-02-23

edjnewhire, you hear it--this is a hard business--you are going to have some very long days--can you SO and kids handle you being late--working Saturdays?  If so welcome to the club--Jones is a good place to start--good luck on your new career.

Broker24's picture
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Newhire,
I'm sure you will make more than what you have ever made before in your first year.  My first full year I made about 75K, which was just above average I think.  Now, because of my background, previous salary, and geography, I was at the highest salary band, but that was still only about 30K or something, not even sure.  But when you add in all the bonuses (milestone, new accounts, etc.) and commissions, it brought me to about 75K.  I used to make north of 125K in my previous career, so this was a downshift for me.  I would expect that you should make AT LEAST 50-55K.  If you make less either of your first two years, you probably aren't going to make it.  They key is, you just have to make it.  If you do, your income worries will be non-existant.  DO NOT get sucked in by the GK assets.  It will drag you down and spit you out of the business.  Build your OWN book.  The GK should just be a little cushion for you.  A GK plan can help you survive and stay in the game the first few years, but it can also be a recipe for long-term failure (by relying on that small stream of income).  I have found the biggest failures are the people that didn't need a big income to be comfortable (retired military with good pensions, young kids that were used to making $12/hr., etc.)  

EDJ4now's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-08

I hope you know what you are getting into.  I started about your age with little kids and it was hard.  I also had a stay at home wife, and frankly the first 3 years I didn't give as much time to my family as I would have preferred.  I think if my wife wasn't there to pick up the slack I would have quit before I "turned the corner."
 
Also, remember that those averages don't include the people who don't make it.  When I left EDJ after 3 years, there were 3 out of my 15 person class still left.  So our average production was pretty high, but we were the top 20%.  The bottom 80% weren't included in the average.  That means the 80% who were working 60 hours a week and making $35,000 were not included in that average.
 
The second year is the toughest, because the salary goes away.  Most people see their income drop the 2nd year.  Again, you can't trust the averages because they don't include the dropouts.
 
I'm not saying it can't be done, but it is difficult.  I believe the current setup with the milestone bonuses helps those who are doing well, but if you are struggling you aren't getting any lifelines.  I know you think  you will be in the 20% that succeeds, but so does everyone else.
 
Good luck.

advisorman's picture
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Joined: 2007-12-14

This occupation is a "one day at a time" business. You need to get up everyday and think of new ways to meet potential clients and then go out and do it that same day. You also have to like meeting and helping people. If this does not come easy this job can be hell and if you think you can go through the motions and be successful you are just fooling yourself and your clients.
 
The best FAs are ones that love or at least like this business and make sure that "everyday" they do something to build their business. If you look at it as a grind or an up hill battle for three years you most likely will not make it.

Brian1960's picture
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I think the biggest advantage of the good knight program is that you get to see how someone successful does it. I agree that the assets you get from them probably won't be your best clients but I also have a friend that started about the same time as me with Jones as a good knight and recieved a client that only had $50,000 with the seg 5 IR and within the second year transferred over $5,000,000 to him that the former guy didn't even know she had.
 
I also have another suggestion that will make a difference in the time it takes to be profitable. It wasn't my idea but we have a young man in our region that started just out of college and is a Segment 5 IR in less than 3 years. For sure that is not average but he says when Jones told him to make 25 "real" contacts in  a day he decided to make 50 contacts and become a success in 1/2 the time.
 
I wish you all the luck in the world but know that only hardwork will make you a success and 5 years from now you will be very happy that you put the effort forward. This is a great career but many quit without giving it their best. At least give it your best so if it doesn't work out you won't have to wonder for the rest of your life, What if?
 
God Bless
Brian

MISS JONES's picture
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Joined: 2007-08-28

Man I wish I was motivated to work that damn hard.. 50 contacts a day. I think that depends on your market. I sometimes worked Saturday and Sundays to get my 125 for the week.
Wow- I really couldn't turn the clock back and do that ALL over again. I don't know how I made it the first time.. ha ha ha
 
Miss J

advisorman's picture
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Miss J,
I am sure they are making their 50 a day on the phone and it is mostly cold calling. I rather mix it up with phone and then face to face when I can. You can still build a nice business with 25 a day.

compliancejerk's picture
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advisorman wrote:Miss J,
I am sure they are making their 50 a day on the phone and it is mostly cold calling. I rather mix it up with phone and then face to face when I can. You can still build a nice business with 25 a day.
 
Sounds like you have a great face for radio

advisorman's picture
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Sounds like you are a jackass.

Roadhard's picture
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Edjnewhire, you would get better information from Advisorman, Spaceman Spiff, Miss Jones, and Brian1960 if you just private message them from this point. 

compliancejerk's picture
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advisorman wrote:This occupation is a "one day at a time" business. You need to get up everyday and think of new ways to meet potential clients and then go out and do it that same day. You also have to like meeting and helping people. If this does not come easy this job can be hell and if you think you can go through the motions and be successful you are just fooling yourself and your clients.
 
The best FAs are ones that love or at least like this business and make sure that "everyday" they do something to build their business. If you look at it as a grind or an up hill battle for three years you most likely will not make it.
 
And from what other firms do you know this claim to be true or did some GP bestoe this wisdom upon you. Blessed are the followers of Jim Jomes

troll's picture
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compliancejerk wrote:advisorman wrote:This occupation is a "one day at a time" business. You need to get up everyday and think of new ways to meet potential clients and then go out and do it that same day. You also have to like meeting and helping people. If this does not come easy this job can be hell and if you think you can go through the motions and be successful you are just fooling yourself and your clients.
 
The best FAs are ones that love or at least like this business and make sure that "everyday" they do something to build their business. If you look at it as a grind or an up hill battle for three years you most likely will not make it.
 
And from what other firms do you know this claim to be true or did some GP bestoe this wisdom upon you. Blessed are the followers of Jim JomesActually compliancejerk, I thought this was a pretty good post...Maybe you should get over your obsession with advisorman and take each post as it stands....if you can....

advisorman's picture
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joedabrkr wrote: compliancejerk wrote:advisorman wrote:This occupation is a "one day at a time" business. You need to get up everyday and think of new ways to meet potential clients and then go out and do it that same day. You also have to like meeting and helping people. If this does not come easy this job can be hell and if you think you can go through the motions and be successful you are just fooling yourself and your clients.
 
The best FAs are ones that love or at least like this business and make sure that "everyday" they do something to build their business. If you look at it as a grind or an up hill battle for three years you most likely will not make it.
 
And from what other firms do you know this claim to be true or did some GP bestoe this wisdom upon you. Blessed are the followers of Jim JomesActually compliancejerk, I thought this was a pretty good post...Maybe you should get over your obsession with advisorman and take each post as it stands....if you can....
 
Appreciate the help with compliancejerk. He spent all day tracking down everything comment I made and tried to trash it. He is my first cyber stalker and hopefully my last.

compliancejerk's picture
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cluelessboy,
 
"well there you go again"  I spent all of 5 minutes "tracking" your pearls of wisdom down.
 
I used the search function at the top right hand side of this page.  Or for you it's the the one with the small magnifying glass.

DJRoss's picture
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Not saying that this is a bad thing, but why would you do that? 

compliancejerk's picture
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you've got a point DJRoss.

Broker24's picture
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compliancejerk wrote:advisorman wrote:This occupation is a "one day at a time" business. You need to get up everyday and think of new ways to meet potential clients and then go out and do it that same day. You also have to like meeting and helping people. If this does not come easy this job can be hell and if you think you can go through the motions and be successful you are just fooling yourself and your clients.
 
The best FAs are ones that love or at least like this business and make sure that "everyday" they do something to build their business. If you look at it as a grind or an up hill battle for three years you most likely will not make it.
 
And from what other firms do you know this claim to be true or did some GP bestoe this wisdom upon you. Blessed are the followers of Jim Jomes
 
It doesn't seem like that advice has anything specifically to do with Jones.  I would say that is good advice for anyone in this business, or any sales profession, for that matter.

compliancejerk's picture
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Broker24 wrote:compliancejerk wrote:advisorman wrote:This occupation is a "one day at a time" business. You need to get up everyday and think of new ways to meet potential clients and then go out and do it that same day. You also have to like meeting and helping people. If this does not come easy this job can be hell and if you think you can go through the motions and be successful you are just fooling yourself and your clients.
 
The best FAs are ones that love or at least like this business and make sure that "everyday" they do something to build their business. If you look at it as a grind or an up hill battle for three years you most likely will not make it.
 
And from what other firms do you know this claim to be true or did some GP bestoe this wisdom upon you. Blessed are the followers of Jim Jomes
 
It doesn't seem like that advice has anything specifically to do with Jones.  I would say that is good advice for anyone in this business, or any sales profession, for that matter.
 
Actually I'd say it is very poor planning
"one day at time" was good for Eddy Van Halen's wife but look how much weight she had to lose.
 
Success requires months if not years of advanced planning ....since your firm believes in such a high "turn over" one day at a time is more appropriate.

Maxstud's picture
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compliancejerk wrote:Success requires months if not years of advanced planning ...What an idiot.  Are you still planning or have you done anything yet, except stay at home and watch the sick kids?

compliancejerk's picture
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Mr. Maxstud,
 
If you are going to quote me,  could you please at least use the entire sentence?
 

"Success requires months if not years of advanced planning ....since your firm believes in such a high "turn over" one day at a time is more appropriate."
 
I have been able to work from home and have access to all my files and client accounts for quite sometime now.  How long have you been able to do that with your firm????
 
I haven't had to fax or call in a trade because the satellite went dead (Nov '04 ring a bell). During the winter I (or my assitant) haven't had to climb up to get the snow or ice off (so that we could get connected to that wonderful DOS screen).....speaking of which I heard that the green screen is still in use?
 
If you are changing you "game plan" each and every day, how do you what works?  Why do think your firm has you doorknocking in the early days of your career?  To get prospects is only part of it, the other to force you to get comfortable meeting new people. 
 
Tracking sources, consistancy and referrals in my career have made the biggest impact not daily changes. Without planning I could not have stayed at home with the kids.  If that's being an idiot...I'd rather live that way then having to worry about where new prospects are going to come from but that's only my idiotic lifestyle.

Maxstud's picture
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compliancejerk wrote:
 
If you are going to quote me,  could you please at least use the entire sentence?
 
No.QUOTE=compliancejerk]Mr. Maxstud,

 
I have been able to work from home and have access to all my files
and client accounts for quite sometime now.  How long have you been
able to do that with your firm????
 

About a year or so I guess.  My office is 15 minutes away so I rarely use it.
compliancejerk wrote:
I haven't had to fax or call in a trade because the satellite went
dead (Nov '04 ring a bell). During the winter I (or my
assitant) haven't had to climb up to get the snow or ice off (so that
we could get connected to that wonderful DOS screen).....speaking of
which I heard that the green screen is still in use?
 

Rings a bell but didn't impact me since I was studying for the series
7,  I don't worry to much about things that happened 3 years ago or 5
year ago or 10 years ago.  Yes I still use the green screen, it's very
retro,  I think it will come back along with disco.
compliancejerk wrote:
 

If you are changing you "game plan" each and every day, how do you what works?  

Sounds like A-mans statement is part of his game plan.
compliancejerk wrote: Why do think your firm has you
doorknocking in the early days of your career?  To get prospects is
only part of it, the other to force you to get comfortable meeting new
people. 
 

GENIUS!!  I never realized that.   sw

DJRoss's picture
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While compliancejerk IMO can be a bit abrasive in his/her responses, I have to side with him/her on this issue. Planning is the key that opens the door to making this a great career. It is interesting that there are so many diehards on this forum that profess tactics that require giving up a social life, family, etc for the first couple of years. They seem to promote the idea that 10-12 hour days are the norm and that if you are not willing to put in those 10 hour days prospecting, prospecting, prospecting you will eventually wash out.Nobody is talking about planning unless it is to denigrate the concept as being a waste of time as in "If you are not prospecting you are not making money." A consensus here seems to be that it does not matter how you contact, just as long as you do.So many on another thread drooled all over one post claiming to advise nubes who had no network and were just coming out of college. The advice was to contact 25000 business and professional customers over the first 500 days. When I read that I began doing the math. In order to actually make that many successful contacts you would need a ratio of 3.2 calls per reached contact. That adds up to 160 calls per diem. The amount of time needed to do this including actual conversations with prospect, leaving messages, speaking with gatekeepers, playing voice menu ping pong has not been considered. If the average phone call takes five minutes of your day, you would need to prospect by phone 13.3 hours a day every day. When do you begin actually closing business even over the phone as this "sage" advice claims? When do you have the time to fax, email pdf's, receive signed documentation, have office nanny process it for you, etc etc. What about follow ups to solicit even more business?Time can come to be your enemy when pushing an automatonic methodology. Now I have spent literally 4 days working with and closing 2 clients; one family and one business. That means doing the math I have missed out on 4 days of phone calls: At 160 calls per diem divided by 3.2 ratio and multiplied by 1% (according to the advice given and penetration assumed) leaves you with 2 accounts. Wow, I got my two accounts without having to do that. Here is the kicker. Those 2 accounts are impersonal and to solicit referrals immediately upon the close will get you what? The time spent sitting down with my clients in a referral activity that we always perform upon the close provides statistically a 70% success rate. Of the two clients I received 25 referrals of which 17-18 will become new clients. To believe that a machine like approach is somehow necessary to achieve success is myopic. Our Agency manager tells all nubes the reason he loves this career is because he can be his own boss, create his own schedule and do something that provides value in helping others. He is all about working hard. He emphasized the importance of planning well and working hard. He never tells us when to show up to the offices or even if we ever show up. This applies to the first day on the job nubes as well. We are never told how to strategize our business, but we do help each other out if something is working for us, we tend to share it since we actually want everyone to succeed, since we are not cannibalizing off of each other. We do like all agencies have standards that we need to meet, but they are so low that if you cannot achieve them than you definitely need to look for another line of income. Pounding your head against the quotron (yes I have just dated myself) every day so to speak does not mean you are maximizing your opportunities.The challenge for many especially in wire houses is to find a shop that will allow you to fly out the door on day one. Places that demand you show up, sit in your cubical and hound the phones all day are doomed to repeat the G Force rotating door syndrome over  and over again. I think some are actually quite proud that they were able to survive the culling processes at places like this. "I am one of 8 remaining of a group of 65" Kind of like Zebra bragging that they are the last remaining of their herd having made it past the Lions, Hyenas, Crocodiles as well as poachers.To me, making as much if not more money than some of these Darwinian Dandies  from the get go, while never missing a recital, football game, concert, or any other activities that my children are involved in IMO provides greater life value. Working from home if I feel like it, like today (slushy snowy weather out there and I am not inclined to go to the office right now ) is the kind of freedom I demand. So it is about making this all work. If you want to pound the sand hoping you are one of the lucky Zebras who will make it across the Savannah, rock on. As for me, I would rather continue to develop my plan, making adjustments as needed so that my business can continue to grow.

advisorman's picture
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Well said. We all should have a plan and be able to adapt our plan as the situation changes.

compliancejerk's picture
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advisorman wrote:This occupation is a "one day at a time" business. You need to get up everyday and think of new ways to meet potential clients and then go out and do it that same day. You also have to like meeting and helping people. If this does not come easy this job can be hell and if you think you can go through the motions and be successful you are just fooling yourself and your clients.
 
The best FAs are ones that love or at least like this business and make sure that "everyday" they do something to build their business. If you look at it as a grind or an up hill battle for three years you most likely will not make it.

 
Every time I see a "helpful" post from advisorman I don't know wether to laugh or cry.
 
C'mon what sort of consulting could you have done for corporate America that made you want to give it up for the boys of Jim Jones.?
 
If you consulted for corporate America what kept you from getting in with a UBS or Wachovia (their independent division has been around for "few years" sorta like the indy side of RJ but I bet you already knew that being the consultant to corporate America for the last quarter century)?
 
 

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I agree CJ, it sounds like he's contradicting himself.But don't you need to both attributes in order to succeed?  You need to be organized and use your time well, and also be action-oriented to reach out to clients and prospects and get things done?

Consejero's picture
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compliancejerk wrote:advisorman wrote:This occupation is a "one day at a time" business. You need to get up everyday and think of new ways to meet potential clients and then go out and do it that same day. You also have to like meeting and helping people. If this does not come easy this job can be hell and if you think you can go through the motions and be successful you are just fooling yourself and your clients.
 
The best FAs are ones that love or at least like this business and make sure that "everyday" they do something to build their business. If you look at it as a grind or an up hill battle for three years you most likely will not make it.

 
Every time I see a "helpful" post from advisorman I don't know wether to laugh or cry.
 
C'mon what sort of consulting could you have done for corporate America that made you want to give it up for the boys of Jim Jones.?
 
If you consulted for corporate America what kept you from getting in with a UBS or Wachovia (their independent division has been around for "few years" sorta like the indy side of RJ but I bet you already knew that being the consultant to corporate America for the last quarter century)?
 
 
 
You truly are a jerk. So who else do you need to insult so you can feel good. After reading your comments in this forum it is obvious you are a pretty pathetic person. I just find it strange that someone so unprofessional could even call them self a IR or FA. But you do have this forum to rule or wreck and I am sure you will do your best at making sure it is worthless for everyone. I will try and find a real forum that might be helpful to true professionals and not "has beens" like yourself. In closing you truly are a disgusting human being and heaven help your children that you ignore while you spew hate sitting in your pompous ass chair.
 
Adiós Jerk.

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Consejero wrote:

 
Every time I see a "helpful" post from advisorman I don't know wether to laugh or cry.
 
C'mon what sort of consulting could you have done for corporate America that made you want to give it up for the boys of Jim Jones.?
 
If you consulted for corporate America what kept you from getting in with a UBS or Wachovia (their independent division has been around for "few years" sorta like the indy side of RJ but I bet you already knew that being the consultant to corporate America for the last quarter century)?
 
  
You truly are a jerk. So who else do you need to insult so you can feel good. After reading your comments in this forum it is obvious you are a pretty pathetic person. I just find it strange that someone so unprofessional could even call them self a IR or FA. But you do have this forum to rule or wreck and I am sure you will do your best at making sure it is worthless for everyone. I will try and find a real forum that might be helpful to true professionals and not "has beens" like yourself. In closing you truly are a disgusting human being and heaven help your children that you ignore while you spew hate sitting in your pompous ass chair.
 
Adiós Jerk.
 

 
I am so hurt that such a newbie with so much info to "help" others would feel that way.
I see advisorman has learned how to clone himself with with a new identity.
 

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Mr. Jerk, your rage on Aman is your issue. Aman needs to get some bigger balls and learn how to handle "pequeñas ratas" like yourself. We all feel bad he was your latest victim but he needs to learn how to fight his own battles if he can. Now on to you. I see you use these little emoticons to express yourself. Do you cry? Maybe you are not Senior Jerk but Senorita Jerk. Maybe you are this way because of your failures at Jones or McDonald's or Pizza Hut. All I know is the I encourage everyone to take you on until you start treating others like human beings and not punching bags. If that is even possible.
 

Adiós poco Princess

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aww muffin, I do cry.
I cried during Brian's Song.
I cried when 'da Bears lost. 
I cried when Dog Hill was forced to resign....from laughing so hard.
 
Now I cry because you are trying to stick up for yourself, how sweet is that?
 
Yep you've got me pegged as a loser because I "failed" at JimJones U and now I'm part of the "dark-side"......

Consejero's picture
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Senior Jerk,
 

Yes it is true. "Eres un perdedor".
 

Por favor, sentimos el dolor que le dé

compliancejerk's picture
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Consejero,
 
C'mon muffin,
tell me how you really feel.
 

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You know I was told to stay out of this but some how you guys just cannot stop talking about me. It looks like we have a new jerk. Well you two just battle it out and leave me out of it. When I see either one of your names I am going the other way.
 
May the best man or woman win and also consejero most of us speak English on this forum so please help us and keep it so we can all understand.

compliancejerk's picture
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advisorman wrote:You know I was told to stay out of this but some how you guys just cannot stop talking about me. It looks like we have a new jerk. Well you two just battle it out and leave me out of it. When I see either one of your names I am going the other way.
 
May the best man or woman win and also consejero most of us speak English on this forum so please help us and keep it so we can all understand.
 
aww muffin I knew you couldn't stay away from me.
Advisorman I can see that you have completed the Jonestown "inclusion" program with flying colors.  You must have taught the same message as a consultant to corporate America.... such compassion!
 
What a way for you to treat someone who was defending you.
 
adios amigo
dos cervasa por fa vor (hey at least I'm trying)

Consejero's picture
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compliancejerk wrote:advisorman wrote:You know I was told to stay out of this but some how you guys just cannot stop talking about me. It looks like we have a new jerk. Well you two just battle it out and leave me out of it. When I see either one of your names I am going the other way.
 
May the best man or woman win and also consejero most of us speak English on this forum so please help us and keep it so we can all understand.
 
aww muffin I knew you couldn't stay away from me.
Advisorman I can see that you have completed the Jonestown "inclusion" program with flying colors.  You must have taught the same message as a consultant to corporate America.... such compassion!
 
What a way for you to treat someone who was defending you.
 
adios amigo
dos cervasa por fa vor (hey at least I'm trying)
 

Jerk,
 
I was not defending Aman. That is his problem. No I am focusing on you and your ability to take a good thread and turn it into garbage. You almost seem happy with your little emoticons when you are trying to make some point about either yourself or heaven forbid Jones. I do not work for Jones, do not care to know about Jones and have no interest in working for Jones because I think their approach to the business is poor but the rest of the firms are also flawed. I have been indy for many years and even using the "indy" firms can be a hassle. How about let's talk about making it better and not how crappy Jones is?
 
I have a famous spanish quote for you. I will type it in English and I hope you understand what it says. It is from Quevedo
 
He who spends time regretting the past loses the present and risks the future”
 
 

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stoic faced respose,
 
"he who fails to learn from histroy, is bound to repeat it"
 
Mr. Glass my 10th Grade history teacher

Consejero's picture
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compliancejerk wrote:stoic faced respose,
 
"he who fails to learn from histroy, is bound to repeat it"
 
Mr. Glass my 10th Grade history teacher
 
So when are you going to start learning and stop regretting?

compliancejerk's picture
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[quote=Consejero
So when are you going to start learning and stop regretting?
 
ooooooooo snappy comeback
 
I started learning way back when and continue to do everyday
just like 'old blue eyes' ...regrets i have a few,

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