Asset Allocation MFDs Help

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Malcolm's picture
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Joined: 2004-12-02

Does anyone know of any mutual fund asset allocation funds that have reportable track records of 5 years or more?  I don't think any exist.  It shows a 10 yr Lipper rating for some reason but it has only been around for 2003.  Idex is only three years also.
I want to clean up some dead small accounts and get them into the same fund that is all-in-one so I can keep better track of things. 

Malcolm's picture
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Joined: 2004-12-02

Oops...that was the Ivy Asset Strategy Fund I was referring to with the 10yr Lipper rating  

dude's picture
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Joined: 2005-11-15

WM Funds have some great allocation products.  Definitely check them out.

troll's picture
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Joined: 2004-11-29

www.accesssor.com is worth a look....

Mike Damone's picture
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Joined: 2004-12-01

Franklin Templeton.

dude's picture
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Joined: 2005-11-15

Franklins Templetons' Founding Funds strategy is a winner, but it is not really an 'allocation' fund per se.

dude's picture
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Joined: 2005-11-15

WM's allocation funds have been around for over 5 years.  Franklin Templetons' Founding Funds has been around for 3 years but it's constituent funds have been around for 50 plus years.

blue's picture
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Joined: 2006-08-22

You can check out putnams as well. Not that I ever sold any.

The Judge's picture
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Joined: 2006-06-06

Evergreen Asset Allocation (EAAFX) just celebrated 10 years.

dude's picture
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Joined: 2005-11-15

Putnam's allocation funds suck compared to WM and Franklin Templeton.

STL Indy's picture
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Joined: 2006-05-20

Most of the ones that have been around for 5+ years aren't really true asset allocation funds and are only a "fund of funds" like FT's Founding Funds.  You're essentially getting 3 funds with one ticket drop, but there's not management going on or daily asset allocation.
TransAmerica IDEX mutual funds (allocation done by Morningstar) have been around since 3/02, so we're almost up to the 5yr point with them. 

dude's picture
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Joined: 2005-11-15

WM Funds were some of the first to introduce a traditional "allocation fund", I'm sure they have a few with 10 year track records (or close).

Soothsayer's picture
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Joined: 2005-02-24

blue wrote:You can check out putnams as well. Not that I ever sold any.
Putnam's Growth Strategy has been outstanding.  Just out of 5-star territory for 1,3, and 5 year periods.  I also like Goldman's strategy funds.  Finally, I would recommend John Hancock's newer product that utilizes several different money managers (24, I believe) screened by Deutche Bank. 

Soothsayer's picture
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Joined: 2005-02-24

dude wrote:WM Funds have some great allocation products.  Definitely check them out.
WM Fund group was recently sold off from WaMu.  I would steer clear.

Soothsayer's picture
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Joined: 2005-02-24

The Judge wrote:Evergreen Asset Allocation (EAAFX) just celebrated 10 years.
It is also important to note that Grantham and crew has never had a negative performance year over those 10 years--including 2001 and 2002.

Soothsayer's picture
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Joined: 2005-02-24

dude wrote:Putnam's allocation funds suck compared to WM and Franklin Templeton.
The numbers don't bear that out.  That is your perception.  In the "What Have You Done For Me Lately" period, Putnam is giving WM a pretty swift ass-kicking.

NASD Newbie's picture
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Joined: 2005-08-01

Why could an investor not determine which funds perform best on his own?
Why should he pay a fee to somebody who does little more than subscribe to Morningstar and Lipper?

Soothsayer's picture
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Joined: 2005-02-24

NASD Newbie wrote:
Why could an investor not determine which funds perform best on his own?
Why should he pay a fee to somebody who does little more than subscribe to Morningstar and Lipper?

Because they work all day.  And when they get done doing whatever it is that they are good at, they would rather come home and help their kids with homework.  Or volunteer at the library.  Or go to dinner with their spouse or a group of friends.  They'll leave the screening of mutual funds to the guy who subscribes to Morningstar or Lipper.  They have better things to do. 

NASD Newbie's picture
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Joined: 2005-08-01

Soothsayer wrote:NASD Newbie wrote:
Why could an investor not determine which funds perform best on his own?
Why should he pay a fee to somebody who does little more than subscribe to Morningstar and Lipper?

Because they work all day.  And when they get done doing whatever it is that they are good at, they would rather come home and help their kids with homework.  Or volunteer at the library.  Or go to dinner with their spouse or a group of friends.  They'll leave the screening of mutual funds to the guy who subscribes to Morningstar or Lipper.  They have better things to do. 

Ah, I see.  Do you think they'll reconsider that if their funds lose 20% in a year?

scrim67's picture
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Joined: 2005-04-28

In my initial consultations I usually talk about fees early in the conversation.
I tell them; "Look, you can do this on your own and it will be less expensive.  If you decide to hire me to help you it will cost you an additional 1 to 1.5% per year depending on what exactly we do."
After this we usually move on with the process.
scrim

Soothsayer's picture
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Joined: 2005-02-24

Maybe.  Maybe not.  Depends whether or not they're too busy to notice.  Or if they are squirrelly by nature.  It also depends on how the fund was sold or presented to them.  If the broker or advisor presented the fund with a "hypo", thereby implicitly promising a 9-10% positive return, then they'll probably bail. 
Let me ask you, if you're home goes down 20% in value next year when the real estate market cools its heels, are you going to move? 

NASD Newbie's picture
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Joined: 2005-08-01

Soothsayer wrote:
Maybe.  Maybe not.  Depends whether or not they're too busy to notice.  Or if they are squirrelly by nature.  It also depends on how the fund was sold or presented to them.  If the broker or advisor presented the fund with a "hypo", thereby implicitly promising a 9-10% positive return, then they'll probably bail. 
Let me ask you, if you're home goes down 20% in value next year when the real estate market cools its heels, are you going to move? 

No, but I can live in my home.  I might be depending on my investments to pay the utilities though and it will make me nervous as a cat, and resentful as a mistress at Christmas if some advisor is sticking his hand in my pocket once a year because many years earlier he sold me some mutual funds.

dividends's picture
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Joined: 2004-12-04

Here are a few I use:
Alliance Bernstein Wealth Stategy Models (institutional track record much, much longer than the 3 year history they show.  These are the only funds that the Bernstein Private Wealth Group offer to their clients)
https://www.alliancebernstein.com/investments/us/MutualFundD etail.aspx?cid=18627
Goldman Sachs great Morningstar ratings / 8 year track record:
http://www2.goldmansachs.com/client_services/asset_managemen t/mutual_funds/u_s_funds/funds_information/asset_allocation_ portfolios/index.html
MFS Asset Allocation funds (4 year track record)
http://www.mfs.com/wps/portal/!ut/p/.cmd/cs/.ce/7_0_A/.s/7_0 _2SB/_s.7_0_A/7_0_2SB?clearPortletSession=true
Eaton Vance Tax-Managed Asset Allocation Fund (4 year track record)
http://www.eatonvance.com/mutual_funds/fund_info.asp?fund=EA EAX
John Hancock Lifestyle Funds (long track record inside of annuities shown in mutual fund prospectus - Mult-Manager product like Idex but better; i.e. more active management of managers)
http://www.jhfunds.com/Fund/PriceTable.aspx
Huge, huge fan of Evergreen Asset Allocation and think it is one of the best funds on the street.  Like a previous post stated it now has a 10 year track record (GMO has a track record going back to 1988)
Evergreen:
http://evergreen.saleslink.com/index.cfm?edge=main.processLo gin&keywords=563554
GMO:
http://www.gmo.com/America/Strategies/default.htm?tabid=10&a mp;pageid=1&strategyid=weaf-iii
 

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