Anne Field

Anne
Field
Columnist: Fix My Business

Anne Field, is a veteran business journalist. Aside REP., she also writes for Bloomberg/BusinessWeek, The New York Times, and BusinessInsider.com, among others. Her other areas of specialty include small business and management, in addition to triple-bottom line companies. She’s won numerous awards for her articles, including the American Society of Business Publication Editors Award for Best How-To Article and Best Case Study. She lives in Pelham, N.Y., with her husband Geoff Lewis and two children.  You can see more of her work by visiting www.annefieldonline.com.

Articles
New Town, New Strategy
Moving to a new town without losing any of your old clients is easier than ever.
How to Bust Out to a Fee-Only Model
Pat Howley plans to cut the cord and become a fee-only advisor — only he's not rushing it. Howley left Wachovia two years ago, after 20 years at A.G. Edwards, to join the Moneta Group, an RIA in St. Louis, determined to drop his Series 7. But, with 60 percent of his business in commissions, he knew it couldn't happen right away.
Raising Their Game
With overall headcount in the IBD channel declining, big independent b/ds are offering more products and better services to attract advisors with bigger books and help their own reps grow faster.
When Serving Interferes With Service
Patrick Berry is a Navy SEAL and active reservist, but it's interfering with the growth of his practice.
How Long Can You Go without Making Money?
Going indie can be rewarding. But you have to run the transition gauntlet.
RIA Recruiters' Notebook
Three RIA custodians talk about who they're recruiting and how they're attracting recruits.
Romancing New Clients
The first three months of a client relationship are crucial. Every practice should have a set of systems in place to make sure nothing falls through the cracks.
Romancing New Clients
Five years ago, John Vance was looking for ways to boost revenues at Vance Wealth Group, the Valencia, Calif.-based practice that he’d started two years before. Doing so, he realized, meant introducing more efficient systems and delegating more to his staff. But, as he drilled down further, Vance realized one area was particularly important: his process for handling new clients—specifically, the first three months or so of the relationship.
Reaping the Rewards of Radio
It isn't cheap or easy, but for many financial advisors a radio show is an invaluable prospecting tool.
Ready to Retire
A 57-year-old financial advisor is trying to plan his retirement and prepare a successor in case anything should happen to him. But he's not sure what the best route is.
Clearing the Hurdles To Growth
There are a few common obstacles to expanding an advisory practice, but often they represent blind spots. Once you identify them, you can do something about them
Take a Vacation Without Losing Clients—or Your Head
If you run your own practice, you may not have had a real vacation in a long time
How to Market Yourself—When Marketing is Not Your Strong Suit
After switching broker dealers, a long-time advisor is looking to attract a handful of reps to his new branch and to publicize his association with his current b/d. For advice, as usual, we asked our panel of experts for their opinions
Getting Employees to Accept Change
Rather than pushing change through as quickly as possible, get your employees involved and ask for their input. You'll have much greater success at making your changes work for you and your business.
Getting Employees to Accept Change
The one constant about change is that people hate it. Trouble is, if your employees don’t embrace whatever change it is you want to introduce, you can forget about it: You won’t succeed.
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